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Thursday, April 25
 

7:30am

8:30am

The Getty Center

Sponsored by The Getty Research Institute

The bus will depart the Sheraton Hotel at 8:30. Arriving at the Getty Center by 10:00. Discover the Getty Center campus located in the hills above Brentwood with its breathtaking views of Los Angeles and the Pacific Ocean beyond. The day begins with a curator-led tour of the special exhibition Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940–1990 part of Pacific Standard Time Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A.

Following the exhibition, the group will visit the Getty Research Institute for a tour of the Research Library and Special Collections with a presentation of rare books and archival holdings.

After the tours, you will have several hours of free time to explore the campus, enjoy the architecture and views, visit the Robert Irwin Central Garden and have lunch on your own in the café before meeting around 3:30 for departure back to the hotel.

Maximum Participants: 40

Fee: $65

Accessibility: Moderate level of walking. Ramps and elevators are available throughout the campus. Wheelchairs are provided. 

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Thursday April 25, 2013 8:30am - 5:30pm
Off-site

8:30am

Photographing Photographs?: Considerations when Taking Digital Images of Images

Instructors:

Anne Blecksmith, Head of Digital Services, Getty Research Institute

Tracey Schuster, Head of Photo Archive Services, Getty Research Institute

Teresa Soleau, Digital Library Specialist, Getty Research Institute

Staff of Digital Services, Getty Research Institute

Photograph archives and digital collections share many commonalities; however, despite their apparent overlaps, they are not transposable. Largely focused on imaging and digital preservation, standards for the digitization of photographs are multifarious and have been through many versions and interpretations. Authored by the Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz in 2009 and signed by almost 800 international institutions, the Florence Declaration, was drafted to define high-level objectives for the representation and preservation of analog photograph collections together with their digital counterparts, not only as objects and assets, but also for their material and research values. Although the objectives in the declaration will serve as a guide, the workshop will provide a walk-though of digitization workflows from selection to preparation and capture to ingest; explore possibilities to structure and represent photographic collections in digital form for research and discovery; and will provide participants the opportunity to pose questions. Questions might include: What promise does digitization hold for online representation of these historic media? How does digitization compliment content and preservation (analog and digital)? Are there more innovative ways to explore photograph collections in digital repositories? What does the future hold for these collections? Selected photograph collections at the Getty Research Institute will be compared to their counterparts the digital repository. Visits to photography studios and a demonstration of the digitization process (selection, preparation, capture and ingest) will be given to participants in this hands-on workshop.

The workshop will take place at the Getty Research Institute. Workshop participants will travel to and from the Getty on the same bus with the Getty Center Tour participants making the duration of the day 8:30 am - 5:30 pm. The workshop will be 10:15 am - 2:00 pm (three hours with a lunch break). There will be time after the workshop for an optional Research Library tour or free time on your own. 

Maximum Participants: 15

Fee: $65

Transportation: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby at 8:20am. Hired busses depart at 8:30am from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. If arriving to and/or departing from the Getty Center by your own means of transportation and will not travel with group, please contact Sarah Sherman ssherman@getty.edu. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this workshop. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Thursday April 25, 2013 8:30am - 5:30pm
Getty Research Institute Getty Center, 1200 Getty Center Drive, Los Angeles, CA, 90049

9:00am

Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Watts Towers

The bus will depart the Sheraton Hotel at 9:00. The tour starts at 10:00 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) with a one-hour curator-led tour of the Stanley Kubrick exhibition.  Following the tour, the group will receive a presentation on the conservation challenges of Watts Towers, by Frank D. Preusser, PhD, Senior Conservation Scientist, LACMA.  After the presentation, participants will have free time to explore the museum and have lunch on their own. At 1:30, the bus will leave LACMA for Watts Towers. The group will have a 30-minute docent-led tour of Watts Towers and have time to view the exhibition on African American sculptor Charles Tatum at the Watts Towers Arts Center. The bus will depart at 4:00 and to return to the Sheraton Hotel by 5:00 pm.

Maximum Participants: 49

Fee:  $110

Accessibility: Moderate level of walking.  The LACMA exhibition is very large, with seating provided. Stairs lead up to the exhibition and elevator access provided.  Wheelchairs are available at LACMA.  No wheelchair accessibility at Watts Towers.

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Thursday April 25, 2013 9:00am - 5:00pm
Off-site

10:30am

JSTOR Image Search Discussion

Organizer: Janine Henri


Thursday April 25, 2013 10:30am - 11:30am
Conference Center 107

11:30am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 107 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Thursday April 25, 2013 11:30am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 107

12:00pm

Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising

We will travel by Metro Gold Line from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles’ Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM) campus.  The tour will begin in the library, the largest specialized fashion library in western United States. Following the library, you will have time to explore the exhibition 20th Annual Art of Motion Picture Costume Design at the FIDM museum on your own before departing back to the Sheraton Hotel by Metro Gold Line.

Maximum Participants: 18

Fee: $35

Accessibility:  Moderate level of walking. A lot of standing throughout the tour. Walking to and from the Metro stops is about 3 city blocks. Elevators at FIDM.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Thursday April 25, 2013 12:00pm - 5:00pm
Off-site

12:30pm

6:30pm

 
Friday, April 26
 

7:00am

8:00am

ProQuest Forum on Digital Resources for Art, Archaeology and Design Research

Help shape the future of digital research – join the editors from ProQuest’s International Bibliography of Art (IBA) and ARTbibliographies Modern (ABM) at a discussion forum where you can share your views and experiences of using online research resources for art, archaeology, and design. With so much material available online in free and library supplied resources, how do you accommodate this in your research process? Is it changing your research methods? Which databases do you rely on and why? If you have opinions on these or any related issues, we would be delighted to hear from you.

Maximum participants: 10


Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 210

8:00am

ARLIS/NA Yearlong Career Mentoring: Crafting our Future Leaders

Instructors:

Anna Simon, Research & Instruction Librarian, Georgetown University

Heather Slania, Director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center, National Museum of Women in the Arts

This four-hour workshop is the kick-off meeting of the ARLIS/NA Yearlong Career Mentoring program. Over the course of the workshop participants will be given the tools they need to embark on a successful mentor/mentee relationship from basic mentoring methodology to specific tips on making the mentor/mentee relationship function properly. Workshop participants actively engage in group discussion, role-playing, and breakout sessions which will allow them to process and practice the ideas they learn. Those interested in participating in this program and this training workshop are required to fill out a brief application in order for the Mentoring Subcommittee to match mentor and mentee pairs. 

Application form is available online click here. Application deadline is February 18 and notification of acceptance will be given on March 4.

Maximum Participants: 24

Fee: FREE


Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 212/214

8:00am

Omeka: Creating and Sharing Collections With An Open Source Web Publishing Tool

Instructor:

Jason Miller, Director, Visual Resources Center, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley

Do you have an exhibition idea or a hidden collection that needs exposure? Come learn the basics of Omeka, a free, flexible, and open source web-publishing platform for the display of library, museum, archives, and scholarly collections and exhibitions. You will create your own digital projects with images, audio, video, and texts that meets scholarly metadata standards and creates a search engine-optimized website. The difference between the hosted version of Omeka and the open source server-side version of Omeka will be discussed and participants will learn about the Dublin Core metadata standard for describing digital objects.

Maximum participants: 25

Fee: $50

Address: Art Center College of Design (North Campus) - 1700 Lida St., Pasadena, CA, 91103. [map]

Transportation is by hired bus. Attendees should meet  in the lobby at 7:50 a.m. for an 8:00 a.m. departure. If you plan to  drive yourself to/from Art Center College of Design and will not travel  with the group, please contact Sarah Sherman ssherman@getty.edu. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this workshop. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 12:00pm
Art Center College of Design - North Campus 1700 Lida St., Pasadena, CA, 91103

8:00am

The Art of GLAM-Wiki: The Basics of Sharing Cultural Knowledge with the World on Wikipedia

Instructors:

Sarah Stierch, US OpenGLAM Coordinator for the Open Knowledge Foundation and Wikipedian in Residence at the World Digital Library

Sara Snyder, Webmaster, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

This half-day workshop will explore how your organization can share its cultural heritage content on the world's fifth most popular website: Wikipedia. Based on the instructors knowledge and involvement with the GLAM-Wiki Initiative (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums with Wikipedia), this workshop will teach you how to engage with Wikipedia and the Wikipedia community, the basics of Wikipedia's policies and procedures, basic editing skills to get you started, and unique opportunities to share your institution's cultural heritage holdings with a large and diverse audience of readers and researchers. This workshop aims to build attendee confidence in working with Wikipedia and the importance of sharing data through it - including curatorial data, metadata, and media.

Maximum Participants: 30

Fee: $50

Location: Shatford Library at Pasadena City College, 1570 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91106, 1.7 miles from the Convention Center. [map]

Transportation will be by public bus or taxi (at your expense) or walking. Attendees who want to travel as a group should meet in the lobby at 7:50 a.m. for an 8:00 a.m. departure. If arriving to and/or departing from Pasadena City College by your own means of transportation and will not travel with group, please contact Sarah Sherman ssherman@getty.edu. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this workshop. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk. 



Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 12:00pm
Shatford Library at Pasadena City College 1570 E. Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA, 91106

8:00am

Historic Downtown Los Angeles Walking Tour with the L.A. Conservancy

We will travel by Metro Gold Line from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles. At 9:00 we will meet a Los Angeles Conservancy docent at Angels Flight to begin this walking tour. "The Historic Downtown tour provides an overview of the historical and cultural landmarks of downtown Los Angeles. Covering a wide range of architectural styles, and including anecdotes about the people behind the buildings, this tour is a great way to become acquainted (or re-acquainted) with the unique character of downtown Los Angeles. Historic Downtown, as the area around Pershing Square is known, is the heart of downtown. Some of the most beloved Los Angeles landmarks are in this area, such as the Central Library, Angels Flight, and the Bradbury Building. The history of the area goes back to the founding of the city in 1781, and its architecture tells the story of the growth of the city from the 1890s to the present, including the current trend of conversions of vintage office buildings into loft-style apartments and condos.” The walking tour will end in time to take the Metro back to the Sheraton Hotel to arrive at 1:00.

Note: This same tour will also be given on Monday, April 29, from 8:00 am – 1:30 pm.

Maximum Participants: 45

Fee:  $35

Accessibility:  Challenging level of walking. All participants will be on their feet (walking /standing) for the duration of the tour.  Although there are occasional benches, there is no time that the tour sits down as a whole.  No strenuous steps or hills. A distance of 1 ¾ miles will be covered over the course of the walking tour. Tour is wheelchair accessible. 

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 1:00pm
Off-site

8:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 215 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 8:00am - 5:45pm
Conference Center 215

8:15am

Downtown Los Angeles Fashion District

We will travel by Metro Gold Line from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles’ Fashion District. Justine Limpus Parish, Associate Professor at Art Center College of Design will lead us through the area and offer her knowledge and insights about this 100-block district from an insider’s point of view.  Los Angeles has become the clothing-manufacturing center of the U.S., and the Fashion District is its pulsing heart. A cross between New York’s Canal Street and a Middle-Eastern bazaar with a Latin American flair this area is a hub for textiles, apparel for adults and children, accessories, shoes, cosmetics, even fresh flowers, both in the wholesale and retail markets. There will be time to explore the area’s retailers (credit cards are accepted or you can try your hand at bargaining with cash).   

Maximum Participants: 15

Fee:  $15

Accessibility: Moderate level of walking.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Friday April 26, 2013 8:15am - 1:00pm
Off-site

8:30am

Crafting Assessment Questions: Creating the Tools to Assess Information Literacy Objectives for Art and Design

Instructors:

Rebecca Feind, Librarian for Art and Design, San Jose State University

Kathy Clarke, Librarian, James Madison University

Now that information literacy standards for higher education have been created and are commonly incorporated within university curricula, assessing student mastery of the objectives is the next step in creating a measurable information literacy program. In addition to responding to institutional needs for data on student learning, assessment data is a valuable resource for updating instruction programs based on student knowledge and performance.  While many librarians have vast amounts of anecdotal knowledge about what students know, being able to gather hard data on what students learn from online and in-person instruction can quantify the strengths and needs of your instruction program, making it easier to report on the library’s role in student learning.  Writing effective test questions is the foundation of any assessment endeavor.  Assessing complex abilities, such as information literacy, requires a combination of creativity and formal methodology.  This workshop will focus on the art and science of crafting test questions that assess student knowledge of specific objectives.  Writing useful test questions draws on creativity as well as familiarity with standards.   Using ACRL’s Information Competencies for Higher Education and ARLIS’ Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines, the workshop leaders will engage participants in identifying which objectives lend themselves to being assessed via multiple choice formats.  The essentials of writing multiple-choice items will be addressed via the Haladyna, Downing, and Rodriguez Revised Taxonomy of Multiple Choice Item Writing Guides.  Presented information will include how to select objectives for assessment and elements of effective test questions.  Aspects of test construction and administration will also be addressed.  Workshop participants will have the opportunity to practice writing questions and review sample questions for reliability and validity.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee:  $50


Friday April 26, 2013 8:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 211

9:00am

The Art of Public Speaking: A Studio for Art Librarians

Instructor: Manuel Urrizola, University of California Riverside, Head of Cataloging & Metadata Services

Do you get a little nervous expressing yourself in discussions or interviews? Are you terrified before giving a speech? Whether speaking before a group or talking to your colleagues, you need to learn how to calm down, organize your thoughts, articulate, use props, entertain, advocate, persuade, and inspire. Discover the techniques of introducing a speaker, preparing a speech, and delivering an impromptu talk. Learn and experience the elements of skillful speaking and effective communication—and have some fun learning!

Manuel Urrizola received his B.A. in Art History from Amherst College and his Master of Library Science from UC Berkeley. He is the Head of Metadata & Technical Services for the UC Riverside Libraries, editor of Great Moments in the History of Technical Services, coordinator of Brief Lunchtime Talks, Toastmaster, award-winning speaker, geographer, and poet. Manuel has taught public speaking workshops for schools, universities, public libraries, library conferences, and other organizations.

Note: This workshop will also take place on Saturday, April 27, 9:30 am - 12:00 pm.

Maximum Participants: 25

Fee:  FREE

Location: Armory Center for the Arts, 145 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA, 91103, six blocks from the Convention Center. [map]

Transportation: Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to/from the workshop location which is .7 miles from the Sheraton hotel. Walking and taxis are both viable options. Walkers should meet in the Sheraton lobby for an 8:30 a.m. departure. For more information, including maps, registered attendees should refer to the detailed instructions that were provided via email. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 9:00am - 11:30am
Armory Center for the Arts 145 N. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA, 91103

9:00am

9:00am

Postcards from the Edge VI: Television & Media Industries

Sponsored by UCI Libraries, University of California Irvine 

Instructors:

Nedda Ahmed, Arts Librarian, Georgia State University

Lea Whittington, Head of Technical Services, Serials & Electronic Resources, Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences

In keeping with the "outside the discipline" spirit of previous "Postcards from the Edge" workshops, this hands-on workshop will focus on Television and Media Industries. These subject areas fall outside an art librarian's normal range of subjects, but art librarians may, at some point in their careers, be called upon to serve faculty and researchers active in these fields. Attendees will learn about scholarship in these areas and also gain knowledge through special trial access to a number of the resources used by researchers.

Maximum Participants: 30

Fee: $50

Location: Fuller Theological Seminary, 135 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena, CA, 91101, .6 miles from Convention Center. [map]

Transportation: Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to/from the workshop location which is .6 miles from the Sheraton hotel and .4 miles from the Hilton hotel. Walking and taxis are both viable options. Walkers should meet in the Sheraton lobby for an 8:30 a.m. departure. Specific instructions (including maps) were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this workshop. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 9:00am - 12:30pm
Fuller Theological Seminary 135 N. Oakland Ave., Pasadena, CA, 91101

9:00am

Early California Modern: A Tour of Residential Architecture

Hop on a bus at the Sheraton and travel through Pasadena to Los Angeles' trendy Silver Lake neighborhood passing by Richard Neutra’s former offices and several Neutra residences in the area. We will drive to the hip Los Feliz area of Los Angeles for a tour of Frank Lloyd Wright’s last and largest Mayan-inspired textile-block house, the Ennis House, 1924 (privately owned). After the Ennis House, we will visit Rudolph Schindler’s personal “live-work space,” 1922, now the MAK Center).  The tour will be accompanied by Chris Nichols, cultural aficionado, local historian, chairman emeritus of the Los Angeles Conservancy Modern Committee, and author of Los Angeles Magazine's "Ask Chris" column. Chris will provide expert knowledge about local history and sites. The bus will arrive back at the Sheraton Hotel at 1:00. 

Maximum Participants: 18

Fee: $65

Accessibility: Easy level of walking. There may be some stairs at the Ennis House.

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Friday April 26, 2013 9:00am - 1:00pm
Off-site

9:00am

Exploring El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument: Siqueiros Mural, Avila Adobe, Olvera Street

After a short walk from the Sheraton the group will travel by Metro Gold Line through Highland Park, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Los Angeles, to Union Station. Historic Union Station combines Dutch Colonial Revival, Mission Revival, and Streamline Moderne architecture. Once through the station we will take a short walk across the street to Olvera Street, the oldest part of downtown Los Angeles where there are many historic buildings. There we will tour the Avila Adobe (1818), the oldest standing residence in L.A.  Next we will walk a short distance to the newly restored América Tropical mural (1932) and stop at the viewing platform and interpretive center. América Tropical is the only U.S. public mural by Mexican artist David Alfaro Siqueiros still in its original location. Leslie Rainer, Senior Project Specialist from the Getty Conservation Institute will give an informative and detailed overview of the mural and talk about the challenges and process of its restoration.

Maximum Participants: 18

Fee: $35

Accessibility:  Moderate level of walking. Majority of the walking will be to and from the Metro stations and through Union Station. The distance from the Sheraton to the Metro Gold Line station is less than a 1/2 mile. 

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Friday April 26, 2013 9:00am - 1:00pm
Off-site

9:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 210 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Friday April 26, 2013 9:00am - 4:45pm
Conference Center 210

9:00am

10:00am

The Norton Simon Museum

We will take a short walk from the Sheraton Hotel to Colorado Blvd. and take the Arts Bus a few short stops to the Norton Simon Museum to enjoy a private tour of Beyond Brancusi: The Space of Sculpture led by the exhibition curator Leah Lehmbeck, before the museum opens to the public. After the tour, there will be time to visit the lovely gardens and permanent collection. Hop on the Arts Bus for the one-mile trip back to the Sheraton with the group, or have lunch on your own at the Museum, or stop in Old Town Pasadena on your walk back to the hotel.

Maximum Participants: 28

Fee: $35

Accessibility:  Moderate walking to the Arts Bus (Route 10) stop at Colorado and Garfield, less than a 1/4 mile from the Sheraton Hotel. The Norton Simon has a short set of stairs as well as a ramp for handicap accessibility.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Friday April 26, 2013 10:00am - 1:00pm
Off-site

12:15pm

Architecture Section + Avery Users Group

The Architecture Section and Avery Users Group meetings have been combined; Architecture Section business will be conducted first, followed by the Avery Users Group business.

Architecture Section moderator: Amy Trendler

Avery Users Group leader: Ted Goodman


Friday April 26, 2013 12:15pm - 1:30pm
Conference Center 211

12:30pm

ArLiSNAP Section

Art Library Students & New ARLIS Professionals (ArLiSNAP)

Section moderator: Suzanne Walsh


Friday April 26, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Conference Center 207

12:30pm

Cataloging Section

Cataloging Section moderator: Bronwen Bitetti


Friday April 26, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Conference Center 208

12:30pm

Reference & Information Services Section

RISS co-moderators: Emilee Mathews and Amy Ballmer


Friday April 26, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Conference Center 214

1:30pm

Break
Friday April 26, 2013 1:30pm - 1:45pm
n/a

1:45pm

Plenary: Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980

Sponsored by UCLA Library

Jointly initiated by the Getty Foundation and the Getty Research Institute, Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945—1980 was an unprecedented collaboration of over 60 cultural institutions across Southern California. Museums, galleries and universities from San Diego to Santa Barbara produced nearly 70 exhibitions and 25 performances examining the birth of the art scene in Los Angeles and how it become a major new force in the art world. From October 2011 to April 2012, Southern California residents and visitors had the opportunity to view exhibitions with wide-ranging art and architecture subjects, from prominent Los Angeles artists such as Ed Ruscha and Ed Kienholz to the lesser-known artists of the ASCO collaborative and from the architecture of Cliff May to an examination of the legacy of architectural historian Esther McCoy.

This panel of curators, scholars and archivists will share their unique experiences in planning, researching, and organizing specific exhibitions and will discuss Pacific Standard Time's enduring impact on scholarship in the arts, and its future as a brand.

Moderator:

Rani Singh, Senior Research Associate, Department of Contemporary Art & Architecture, Getty Research Institute

Panelists:

Jocelyn Gibbs, Curator of Architecture and Design Collection at the Art, Design and Architecture Museum, University of California, Santa Barbara. Curator of Carefree California: Cliff May and the Romance of the Ranch House

Rita Gonzalez, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Curator of Asco: Elite of the Obscure, A Retrospective, 1972–1987

Susan Morgan, Writer. Curator of Sympathetic Seeing: Esther McCoy and the Heart of American Modernist Architecture and Design

John Tain, Assistant Curator, Getty Research Institute. Curator of Greetings from L.A.: Artists and Publics, 1950–1980


Friday April 26, 2013 1:45pm - 2:45pm
Ballroom BC

2:45pm

Break
Friday April 26, 2013 2:45pm - 3:00pm
n/a

3:00pm

Collaborating for Discovery: Expanding Landscapes for Digital Collections through Joint Ventures

Sponsored by the University of California Merced Library

With support from the ARLIS/NA Alternative Voices Fund

CHARTing our Course: Digitizing Brooklyn’s Visual History, a Collaborative Project - Amanda Cowell, Brooklyn Public Library; Twila Rios, MLIS candidate, Pratt Institute and Brooklyn Historical Society intern; Melissa Brown, IMLS Project CHART Intern Coordinator, Brooklyn Museum; and Leah Loscutoff, Digitization Archivist and Project Education Coordinator at the Brooklyn Historical Society

The Seaside Research Portal and the Future of Archiving the Built Environment - Jennifer Parker, Head, Architecture Library, Notre Dame University and Viveca Pattison Robichaud, Visiting Faculty Librarian, University of Notre Dame

Open Source Opens Doors: Bringing your Collection to your Users with Omeka - Meghan Musolff, Special Projects Librarian, University of Michigan and Nancy Moussa, Programmer, University of Michigan Library and Jamie Vander Broek, Exhibits & Programming Librarian and Learning Librarian, University of Michigan

Moderator: Elizabeth Morris, Assistant Librarian, Yale Center for British Art, Reference Library and Archives

Collaboration is a necessity for many institutions as budgets shrink and newer digital technologies are expanding collection access and use. Drawing upon three successful initiatives, this session will discuss the collaborative nature involved for inter-institutional and multi-institutional projects, viable content management system tools and open source software for creating digital resources, and digital project management. Vander Broek, Moussa and Musolff of the University of Michigan will discuss how they configured Omeka to meet existing needs within the library community and how to integrate online exhibits into the library’s website to make these resources more discoverable by users. Cowell of the Brooklyn Public Library and Brown of Brooklyn Museum will discuss Project CHART’s (Cultural Heritage, Access, Research and Technology) innovative approaches to combining multiple asset management systems in a Drupal environment, and they will demonstrate how that innovation was able to allow three cultural institutions to display content cohesively while maintaining individual identities and ownership of content. Resulting from their work on the Seaside Research Portal, Parker and Robichaud of the University of Notre Dame will explore issues associated with collecting and building virtual and physical architectural archives, documenting urban projects, funding large scale digitization efforts and maintaining and expanding these resources as the communities grow and evolve.


Friday April 26, 2013 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Ballroom A

3:00pm

Growing & Reviving Museum Library Audiences Through Programs and Collections

Sponsored by SFMOMA Research Library

Take it to the People: Making Real Change without Big Money - Karen McKenzie, Chief Librarian, Art Gallery of Ontario

The Archive of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and the 'Learning Zone': a Contextual Approach to Documentary Information - Michiel Nijhoff, Head of Library & Collection Registration, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Open Under New Management: Nolen Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art - Naomi Niles, Associate Museum Librarian, Nolen Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Crafting our Financial Future: Building Bridges with Development through Affinity Groups, Eric Wolf, Head Librarian, The Menil Collection

Moderator: Linda Seckelson, Principal Reader Services Librarian, Watson Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Museum librarians will share their strategies for sustaining relevancy and stimulating growth by reaching new audiences as well as reenergizing traditional ones. The speakers will describe practical opportunities for new initiatives and details of their implementation and give voice to a range of experimental initiatives as well as tested library activities to increase visibility, enhance experiences, discover and sustain audiences for our libraries. 

Karen McKenzie will describe how she and her staff at the Art Gallery of Ontario are creating transformational change by reinventing the identity of the AGO’s  century-old museum library in tangible ways, and doing so without creating new costs.   Targets include identifying new audiences; making physical and policy changes to attract, welcome, keep and manage these new users; and negotiating new priorities within traditional activities such as acquisitions and reference. 

Michiel Nijhoff will share the creation of the "learning zone" (opened in September 2012), a space comprised of the archive, library, image archive and archive of moving images in which the various activities of the museum transform a traditional museum library to one that is more vital and efficient for storing, finding and making information accessible.

Naomi Niles will describe a number of library initiatives to reach new audiences. A reorganization of the library has provided opportunities to transform service beyond the status quo. Expansion of the collection along with active participation and collaboration with staff in Education and other departments has provided a range of programming and instructional opportunities for visitors of all ages.

Eric Wolf will discuss development through affinity groups. Nothing is more vital to our future than guaranteeing that we can stay financially solvent and pay for our employees, services, acquisitions, and collection stewardship. Development skills are largely ignored in library school and often looked down upon by librarians, to their own detriment. The more we participate in fundraising, the more we can guarantee our future, both through the fruits of our own fundraising and by revealing to our development departments and institutional directors and trustees that we take our responsibilities seriously and are good members and even leaders of our organizations. 


Friday April 26, 2013 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Conference Center 211

3:00pm

New Voices in the Profession

Con Safos: Balancing Access with Privacy Concerns in a Los Angeles Gang Graffiti Archive - Yvonne B. Lee, Research Assistant, Placa Project

From Hieroglyphs to Hashtags: The Information-Seeking Behaviors of Contemporary Egyptian Artists - Shannon Marie Robinson, Fine Arts Liaison Librarian, Denison University

Visual Resources Talks at Cornell University: Promoting Image Use and Assistance - Marsha Taichman, Visual Resources and Public Services Librarian, Cornell University

Embedding Visual Literacy Instruction in the Undergraduate Curriculum - Amanda Milbourn, Assistant Librarian, Disney Consumer Products (2013 Gerd Muehsam Award winner)

 

Moderators:

Jenna Rinalducci, Art & Visual Technology Liaison Librarian, Fenwick Library, George Mason University

Kimberly Detterbeck, Art Librarian, Purchase College

Returning for a seventh year, the New Voices panel provides new Art Librarianship and Visual Resources professionals the opportunity to present topics from exceptional coursework, such as a master’s thesis, or topics with which they are engaged early in their professional life. New professionals are defined as either students in MLIS or Master’s programs leading to a career in librarianship or visual resources, or those 5 years post Master’s level study. For many, this is their first professional speaking engagement.

This panel began at the ARLIS/NA 2006 conference in Banff and has received wide attention and praise since. Topics presented reveal new ideas, as well as different ways of thinking about old problems, and give the conference attendees a glimpse of the academic interests and current discourses of the newest ARLIS/NA members. The New Voices session is organized by the Professional Development Committee.  This year, the Gerd Muehsam award winner and additional speakers were chosen through cooperation with ArLiSNAP or Gerd Muehsam committee.


Friday April 26, 2013 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Conference Center 212/214

3:00pm

The New Archivist

Sponsored by The Diebenkorn Foundation

In the Studio: Arranging and Describing, a Work in Progress - Ava Jancar, Registrar/Archivist, Mark Grotjahn Studios

Imposing Functional Archival Standards on Artworks and Art Professionals that Instinctually Defy Them - Ben Handler, Archivist, Gagosian Gallery

Museums and the Art of Digital Collections: Confessions of an Itinerate Archivist - Shaula Stephenson, Digital Project Archivist, Hammer Museum

Moderators:

Lynda Bunting, Director of Publications and Communication, Blum & Poe

Virginia Allison, Archivist, LA Louver

The session will discuss current and emerging trends in archival work, particularly how they relate to contemporary art. Contemporary museums, galleries and artist studios have begun to recognize the need for library/archive professionals, but traditionally had interns and studio art majors organize their archival records which are invaluable to the production and exhibition of artwork, as well as commercial sales. The work was often done on a short-term and ad hoc basis which is antithetical to future retrieval and preservation needs. As digital media has become the norm in the workplace, institutions and artists with bigger budgets have turned to professionally trained archivists with MLIS degrees to organize and preserve images, videos, press, catalogs and periodicals in a methodical way. The presenters will discuss their archival settings and how they deviate from traditional workplaces in terms of materials, software systems, standards, or more to the point, the lack thereof. They will also briefly touch upon how they ended up in their current position and what they think the future holds.


Friday April 26, 2013 3:00pm - 4:30pm
Conference Center 107

4:30pm

Break
Friday April 26, 2013 4:30pm - 4:45pm
n/a

4:45pm

Crafting a Thesaurus: an Update on the Artists' Books Thesaurus from the Book Arts SIG

Topic Talk hosted by the Book Arts SIG. Talk will be followed by the regular SIG business meeting. All are welcome!

Crafting a Thesaurus: an Update on the Artists' Books Thesaurus from the Book Arts SIG

Presenters:

Allison Jai O'Dell, Free Library of Philadelphia

Heather Slania, Director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center, National Museum of Women in the Arts

Moderator: Teresa Burk, Book Arts SIG coordinator

This talk will provide an update on the project of the Book Arts Special Interest Group to design a thesaurus for describing and providing subject/genre access to artists' books. A need was identified at the 2012 ARLIS/NA conference for the standardization of terminology used to index artists' books. It is the aim of the working group that this thesaurus will fill a void in the field's continued and pressing interest in cataloging unconventional artist publications that have at once bibliographic, artifactual, social, aesthetic, and conceptual value.

The session will conclude with time allotted for participants to suggest additions to and make critiques of the current draft. It is our goal that by formally introducing the thesaurus at ARLIS/NA 2013, a wider discussion and involvement from the art library and visual resources community will commence, ultimately culminating in a more robust tool.


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:15pm
Conference Center 211

4:45pm

Artists' Files SIG

Artists' Files SIG co-coordinators: Samantha Deutch and Sally McKay


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 214

4:45pm

Book Arts SIG

Book Arts SIG coordinator: Teresa Burk

The Book Arts SIG is pleased to present a Topic Talk with Q&A in the first half-hour of the meeting. All are welcome!

Crafting a Thesaurus: an Update on the Artists' Books Thesaurus from the Book Arts SIG

Presenters: Allison Jai O'Dell, Free Library of Philadelphia and Heather Slania, Director of the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center, National Museum of Women in the Arts

This session will provide an update on the project of the Book Arts Special Interest Group to design a thesaurus for describing and providing subject/genre access to artists' books. A need was identified at the 2012 ARLIS/NA conference for the standardization of terminology used to index artists' books. It is the aim of the working group that this thesaurus will fill a void in the field's continued and pressing interest in cataloging unconventional artist publications that have at once bibliographic, artifactual, social, aesthetic, and conceptual value.

The session will conclude with time allotted for participants to suggest additions to and make critiques of the current draft. It is our goal that by formally introducing the thesaurus at ARLIS/NA 2013, a wider discussion and involvement from the art library and visual resources community will commence, ultimately culminating in a more robust tool.


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 211

4:45pm

Chapter Chairs
Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 210

4:45pm

Collection Development SIG

Collection Development SIG coordinator: Ross Day


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 212

4:45pm

Decorative Arts SIG

Decorative Arts SIG coordinator: Linda Seckelson


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom A (shared)

4:45pm

Digital Humanities SIG

Digital Humanities SIG coordinator: John Taormina

NOTE: Greta Bahnemann will lead the meeting in place of John Taormina


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 209

4:45pm

Fashion, Textile & Costume SIG

Fashion, Textile & Costume SIG coordinator: Sandra Ley


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom A (shared)

4:45pm

Interlibrary Loan SIG

Interlibrary Loan SIG coordinator: Elizabeth Lane


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom C (shared)

4:45pm

LGBTQ SIG

LGBTQ SIG co-coordinators: Deborah Evans-Cantrell and Edward Lukasek


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 107 (shared)

4:45pm

Materials SIG

Materials SIG coordinator: Mark Pompelia


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 208

4:45pm

Photography Librarians SIG

Photography Librarians SIG coordinator: Leigh Gleason


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom C (shared)

4:45pm

Provenance SIG

Provenance SIG coordinator: Philip Dombowsky


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 107 (shared)

4:45pm

Public Librarians SIG

Public Librarians SIG coordinator: Alyssa Resnick


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 206

4:45pm

Space Planning SIG

Space Planning SIG coordinator: Martha Stevenson


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom C (shared)

4:45pm

Stimulating Creativity in Practice (SCIP) SIG

Creativity SIG Coordinator: Annette Haines


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom A (shared)

4:45pm

Teaching Librarians SIG

Teaching Librarians SIG co-coordinators: Krista Ivy and Amy Ballmer


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 204

4:45pm

Urban and Regional Planning SIG

Urban and Regional Planning SIG coordinator: Marsha Taichman


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Conference Center 207

4:45pm

First Time Attendees Welcome

Sponsored by Aux Amateurs de Livres International

Hosted by Deborah Kempe, ARLIS/NA President. Come mix and mingle for a reception with members of the ARLIS/NA Executive Board, as well as other society leaders. Open to all first-time conference attendees. We look forward to meeting you! 


Friday April 26, 2013 4:45pm - 5:45pm
Ballroom B

5:45pm

Archaeology & Classics SIG

Archaeology & Classics SIG coordinator: Amy Ciccone


Friday April 26, 2013 5:45pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 215

5:45pm

Public Policy Committee

Public Policy Committee chair: Carmen Orth-Alfie


Friday April 26, 2013 5:45pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 210

5:45pm

Travel Awards Sub-Committee

Travel Awards Sub-Committee chair: Viveca Pattison Robichaud


Friday April 26, 2013 5:45pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 209

6:30pm

Welcome Party at The Autry National Center of the American West

Sponsored by ARLIS/NA Chapters

Mingle with colleagues and friends, old and new, at the Autry National Center of the American West in Griffith Park. Wander through the featured special exhibition Katsina in Hopi Life and permanent collection exhibition that explores the American Old West through art and Hollywood. Food and drink will add to the festivities. 

Transportation: Buses depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street beginning at exactly 6:30pm.


Friday April 26, 2013 6:30pm - 10:00pm
Off-site
 
Saturday, April 27
 

7:00am

Yoga

Wake up with your ARLIS/NA colleagues and enjoy an energizing yoga practice led by Deborah Ultan Boudewyns. A great way to start off a busy day of conferencing!

 


Saturday April 27, 2013 7:00am - 8:00am
Cordova Room - Sheraton Hotel

7:00am

7:30am

Pasadena Civic Center Walking Tour

Leaving from the Sheraton Hotel, Pasadena Heritage Tours will lead the group through the heart of the city of Pasadena, the Civic Center. The tour will explore architectural details and examine the social history behind the construction and planning of the iconic buildings in this area, now part of the National Register of Historic Places. You will learn about highlights of local landmarks and architects such as the 1925 city planner Edward H. Bennett (protégé of Daniel Burnham planner of the 1893 World Columbia Exposition in Chicago), Julia Morgan’s former YMCA building, George Ellery Hale who was the driving force behind the Civic Center’s construction and it’s Mediterranean style, and the magnificent City Hall designed by the firm of Bakewell and Brown, who also designed San Francisco’s City Hall and much of the Stanford and Berkeley university campuses.

Maximum Participants: unlimited

Fee: $15

Accessibility: Moderate level of walking.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday April 27, 2013 7:30am - 8:45am
Off-site

7:30am

8:00am

ARLIS/Central Plains Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom C (shared)

8:00am

ARLIS/Delaware Valley Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom A (shared)

8:00am

ARLIS/Midstates Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 107

8:00am

ARLIS/Mountain West Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom A (shared)

8:00am

ARLIS/New England Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 106

8:00am

ARLIS/Northwest Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom C (shared)

8:00am

ARLIS/Ohio Valley Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom B (shared)

8:00am

ARLIS/Southeast Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 211

8:00am

8:00am

ARLIS/Western New York Chapter
Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom B (shared)

8:00am

Awards Committee

Award Committee chair: Rebecca Cooper


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 214

8:00am

Cataloging Advisory Committee

Cataloging Advisory Committee chair: Maria Oldal


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 204

8:00am

Communications & Publications Committee

Communications & Publications Committee chair: Amy Lucker


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 207

8:00am

Diversity Committee

Diversity Committee chair: Patrick Tomlin


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 209

8:00am

Finance Committee

Finance Committee chair: Tom Riedel


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 210

8:00am

International Relations Committee

International Relations Committee chair: Holly Hatheway


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 215

8:00am

Membership Committee

Membership Committee chair: Jamie Lausch Vander Broek


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 212

9:00am

Strategic Planning Committee

Moderator: Hannah Bennett


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:00am - 10:00am
Conference Center 215

9:00am

Exhibits Opening with Coffee Break

Co-Sponsored by Erasmus Boekhandel and Statewide Calfornia Electronic Library Consortium (SCELC)


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:00am - 10:30am
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

9:00am

Cataloging Problems Discussion Group

Organizers: Ann Fath and Sherman Clarke


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:00am - 10:30am
Conference Center 209

9:00am

Posters on View

Unattended posters. For full Poster descriptions click here.


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:00am - 4:15pm
Ballroom AB Foyer

9:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 210 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:00am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 210

9:30am

Development Committee

Development Committee chair: Kathryn Wayne


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:30am - 10:30am
Conference Center 208

9:30am

Professional Development Committee

Professional Development Committee chair: Stacy Brinkman


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:30am - 10:30am
Conference Center 204

9:30am

The Art of Public Speaking: A Studio for Art Librarians

Instructor: Manuel Urrizola, Head of Cataloging & Metadata Services, University of California Riverside

Do you get a little nervous expressing yourself in discussions or interviews? Are you terrified before giving a speech? Whether speaking before a group or talking to your colleagues, you need to learn how to calm down, organize your thoughts, articulate, use props, entertain, advocate, persuade, and inspire. Discover the techniques of introducing a speaker, preparing a speech, and delivering an impromptu talk. Learn and experience the elements of skillful speaking and effective communication—and have some fun learning!

Manuel Urrizola received his B.A. in Art History from Amherst College and his Master of Library Science from UC Berkeley. He is the Head of Metadata & Technical Services for the UC Riverside Libraries, editor of Great Moments in the History of Technical Services, coordinator of Brief Lunchtime Talks, Toastmaster, award-winning speaker, geographer, and poet. Manuel has taught public speaking workshops for schools, universities, public libraries, library conferences, and other organizations.

Note: This workshop will also take place on Friday, April 26, 9:00 - 11:30 am.

Maximum Participants: 25

Fee:  FREE


Saturday April 27, 2013 9:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 207

10:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 215 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:00am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 215

10:30am

Artists’ Books: Turning the Page to the Future

Sponsored by Special Collections, University of Santa Cruz Library 

The Marriage of Heaven and Hell: Enabling Discovery of Artists' BooksNina Schneider, Librarian, William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, UCLA 

Contemporary Artist's Books Artist's Publishing- Tony White, Director of Decker Library, Maryland Institute College of Art 

Artists’  Books Deserve Critical Inquiry: JAB the Journal of Artists’  Books 1994-2013 and Beyond - Brad Freeman, Editor/Founder, Journal of Artists' Books (JAB) and Studio Coordinator, Center for Book and Paper Arts, Columbia College 

Galerie de Difformité: (un)Making the Artists' Book Gretchen Henderson, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in the Humanities at MIT 

Moderator: Yvonne Boyer, Librarian for History of Art, Art, French & Italian, Vanderbilt University

The status of books of all kinds is undergoing serious challenges, mostly from the transition from hard copy to digital versions.  As a case study of this trend, artist’s books occupy a special position, as a central premise has been their condition as hand-crafted and unique pieces of art, endowed with highly specific qualities such as materials and form of manufacture, resulting in objects that stress their material presence in real space and time. The digital revolution in the book industry and in librarianship would seem to place the survival of these precious artworks into a state of precariousness.

How will the rapidly advancing technologies transforming writing, publishing, and librarianship create a space where such a traditional and historically hand-labor based form of book making can not only survive, but thrive?  Will contemporary and future artists’ books fully embrace the digital domain and, in doing so, help to formulate the question, “What is a book?” in ways that we cannot anticipate at present?  Those book artists who do not choose to make this shift, who will continue to work with real materials and manual manufacture, will force us to consider ever more deeply how such an object will and should continue to be presented, collected, and read by a public still in the midst of this transformative moment. There may be, however, developments in this specific genre of books that does not take either the digital or the traditional route, but rather re-imagine format and content issues in new and unprecedented ways that will attract a new generation of readers and present opportunities and challenges to libraries.  

This session will present ways of thinking through this challenge from various disciplines, including those of a book artist-scholar, a librarian-scholar, and an emerging book artist.  We librarians need to immerse ourselves in these critical issues at this important stage of their development, as they will affect collection policy, storage, disseminating, as in outreach and exhibition opportunities, and teaching artists’ books.


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 212/214

10:30am

Building Collective Solutions: the Future of Art Bibliography Initiative 4th Annual Update

FAB Initiative Introduction & 4th Annual Update - Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

Research Initiatives update: Ithaka Research Support Services for Art History project - Kathleen Salomon, Assistant Director, Getty Research Institute

The Getty Research Portal - Joe Shubitowski, Head, Information Systems, Getty Research Institute

Artlibraries.net in the Year of the Water Snake : Towards a New Bibliographic Tool for Art History - Jan Simane, Library Director, Kunsthistoricshe Institut in Florence

Reframing Collections for the Digital Age: A Report of the Mellon-funded NYARC Study - Stephen Bury, Director, Frick Art Reference Library

Q&A and Discussion - Building Collective Solutions

Moderators:

Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

Kathleen Salomon, Assistant Director, Getty Research Institute 

This session will provide an overview of the Future of Art Bibliography Initiative, its goals and progress to date as well as explore with attendees pathways to increased community-wide participation and directions for expansion of FAB Initiative projects. This 4th Annual Update will also emphasize how each of the FAB projects is working to promote open access to art historical content, especially fully-digital content.   Presenters will report on progress in each of the three FAB Initiative project tracks, specifically: the Getty Research Portal, artlibraries.net and its collaboration with OCLC, and web-archiving. Presentations will include demonstrations of new online discovery environments, ongoing technical developments, and reports on research initiatives.   Presentations will be followed by facilitated breakout sessions designed to engage attendees in discussions that focus on how to increase community involvement in each of these FAB Initiative tracks, as well as surface new ideas for expansion of the FAB Initiative to other areas of activity.


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 106

10:30am

The Evolution of Art Reference and Instruction: Outreach, Overlay, Online

Assessing Online Reference Services through ARLIS' Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines - Audrey Ferrie, Information Literacy Librarian, Academy of Art University

Deeply Embedded: Library/Studio Partnerships in the Development of Graduate Design Curriculum - Michael Wirtz, Head of Research and Library Technology, Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar

Embedding Outside Your Comfort Zone: Reference & Instruction for the Non-Art Side of Arts Management - Kimberly Detterbeck, Art Librarian, Purchase College SUNY

(m) iReference: Roaming, Flashing and Embedding with Mobile Technology - Liv Valmestad, Art Librarian, University of Manitoba

Moderator: Anna Simon, Research and Instruction Librarian, Georgetown University

As the parameters and service expectations of librarianship shift with changes in academia, art librarians are increasingly tasked with finding creative approaches to provide traditional services. Decentralized art departments, multi-disciplinary research extending beyond the arts, and the visual and tactile proclivities of art and art history students are just a few of the challenges dictating how services are provided. This quartet of art librarians is crafting reference and instruction services that meet students on their own terms. Audrey Ferrie and the Academy of Art University (AAU) have adapted the ARLIS information literacy standards as a basis for remotely evaluating students’ art and design competencies. Using only online reference exchanges, AAU has created a new set of benchmarks to help improve their virtual reference encounters. Michael Wirtz at Virginia Commonwealth University in Qatar is shaping the way services are provided by collaborating with a studio professor to re-craft a research methodology seminar in design. Wirtz is co-teaching this seminar, ensuring that information literacy is overlaid with discipline-specific critical thinking skills. Kimberly Detterbeck has adapted her reference services for the arts management program at Purchase College to include business, management, and legal support—without having institutional programs in these areas. By expanding her expertise and challenging her own perceived limitations, Kim has become fully embedded in the arts management program. Finally, Liv Valmestad, art librarian at the University of Manitoba, has fashioned herself into a mobile iLibrarian by taking her favorite apps and e-tools into the studio and projecting them onto the wall with a mobile device. This form of “iReference” allows her to tailor flash reference events and maintain a presence in the studio. Starting with traditional services and building out, these presentations offer practical techniques and suggestions on how to “hand-craft” reference and information services specific to the needs of today’s and tomorrow’s patrons. 

 


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 211

10:30am

The Future is Now: Considering the Impact of RDA Post-Implementation and What’s Next

RDA for Reference Librarians - L. Chizu Morihara, Art Librarian, University of California, Santa Barbara

Description and Access to Original Prints: RDA and the Future of Art Cataloguing - Marie-Chantal L’Ecuyer-Coelho, Cataloguing Librarian for Graphic Materials, Bibliothèque et Archives Nationales du Québec

RDA and the New BIBFRAME: Is Linked Data the Solution? - Philip Schreur, Head, Metadata Department, Stanford University Libraries

Moderator: Bronwen Bitetti, Associate Librarian, Center for Curatorial Studies, Bard College

The implementation of RDA (Resource Description and Access) by the Library of Congress as well as many national libraries and leading academic institutions in 2013 marks a significant shift in the library cataloging community. Built for the digital environment and capable of expressing complex relationships among entities and their manifestations, RDA promises increased access to resources of heterogeneous formats. In this session we will consider the impact of RDA post-implementation on end-user groups, examine the viability of using FRBR group 1 entities to describe graphic materials and their related manifestations, and speculate on RDA’s future within BIBFRAME, the new data model for web-based bibliographic description proposed by the Bibliographic Framework Initiative.


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 107

10:30am

Exhibits Open
Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 1:30pm
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

10:30am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 209 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Saturday April 27, 2013 10:30am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 209

12:00pm

Break
Saturday April 27, 2013 12:00pm - 12:15pm
n/a

12:00pm

12:15pm

12:15pm

International Attendees Forum

The forum will provide an opportunity for colleagues attending from Latin America and Europe through the support of grants from the Getty Foundation and the Samuel H. Kress Foundation to introduce themselves and share details about their institutions, projects and/or services that may be of interest to others.

This will be an informal brownbag (bring your own lunch) session open to all conference attendees.

Moderator: Martha Gonzalez Palacios, Librarian, Architecture and Planning Library, The University of Texas at Austin 

 


Saturday April 27, 2013 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Conference Center 211

12:15pm

ARTstor User Group Lunch

In 2013 ARTstor is celebrating its 10th year as an independent non-profit devoted to using technology to support teaching, learning, and research.  The Library (with over 1,450 subscribers in 45 countries) now includes over 1.5 million images to support a wide range of artistic, historical, political, social, economic, and cultural documentation from prehistory to the present.  Shared Shelf, a cloud-based cataloging and asset management systems for images and multi-media is now in use at a growing network of institutions, who can then use local content within the ARTstor use platform or publish their content to a variety of local or open sites.  At lunch, ARTstor staff will provide updates on various ARTstor services including the Digital Library, Shared Shelf, and free services like Images for Academic Publishing, Shared Shelf Commons, and the Built Works Registry.

Open to all; capacity limited to 150 attendees; first come, first serve.


Saturday April 27, 2013 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Ballroom A

12:15pm

OCLC Research Library Partnership Roundtable

This annual Roundtable at ARLIS/NA is an opportunity for staff at OCLC Research Library Partnership institutions to hear about and influence OCLC Research plans and priorities and to explore challenges that require collaborative solutions. OCLC Research has staked out some of the most pressing issues facing the library community in the areas of managing metadata, advancing the research mission, mobilizing unique materials and modeling new service infrastructures, and attendees will hear about the latest development in areas of particular impact to art libraries. OCLC RLP partners determine the agenda through a survey. 

The meeting is open to staff at OCLC RLP member institutions, and to prospective members. Please contact Dennis Massie at massied@oclc.org for more information.


Saturday April 27, 2013 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Ballroom B

1:15pm

Break
Saturday April 27, 2013 1:15pm - 1:30pm
n/a

1:30pm

1:30pm

Alt-ARLIS: How Non-Traditional Paths Can Serve Your Career and the Society

Sponsored by the School of Information, University of California Berkeley

From Art Librarian to Publishing Professional: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love ScholComm - Meredith Kahn, Publishing Services and Outreach Librarian, University of Michigan

Not Not a Librarian - Ian McDermott, Collection Development Associate, ARTstor

Outsider Art - Jamie Lausch Vander Broek, Exhibits & Programming Librarian and Learning Librarian, University of Michigan

Sailing the Seas of Interdisciplinarity - Alice Whiteside, Librarian & Information Technology Consultant, Mount Holyoke College

Moderator: Shannon Marie Robinson, Fine Arts Liaison Librarian, Denison University

While our conception of the archetypical ARLIS/NA member might remain lodged somewhere between an art history subject specialist at an academic institution and a librarian at an art museum, a quick search of the member directory proves that our landscape is changing. Titles such as “Fine Arts Librarian” and “Art & Architecture Librarian” are joined by “Digital Asset Manager,” “Learning Zone Librarian,” “Metadata Coordinator,” and “Digital Initiatives Librarian.” ARLIS/NA’s membership is diversifying and alt-ARLIS, an alternative to the traditional path, is a way of life for many of these new members. Inspired by the “alt-ac” movement--an exploration of alternative academic careers--the term alt-ARLIS represents a new way to define oneself as an art information professional.

Four alt-ARLISians will introduce the concept of alt-ARLIS and examine how and why ARLIS/NA remains our professional home. Attendees will leave this session with ideas about how to approach job searches outside of traditional art librarian positions, how service in ARLIS/NA might remain relevant to these careers, and how experiences from outside of traditional art librarian jobs can enrich the society as a whole.


Saturday April 27, 2013 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Conference Center 212/214

1:30pm

Archaeology Archives: Excavating the Record

Sponsored by YBP Library Services and Baker & Taylor Academic

Hidden Archaeological Collections Surface - Trudy Jacoby, Director, Visual Resources Collection, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University


Managing the Digital Dig: Partnerships and Progress on the ArchaeoCore Metadata Project - Lucie Stylianopoulos, Head, Fiske Kimball Fine Arts Library, University of Virginia

Surveying the Survey: Archival Processing, Buildings Archaeology, and Online Outreach - Shalimar Fojas White, Manager, Image Collections and Fieldwork Archives, Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection

The Tracking Samothrace Project - Kim Collins, Art History Librarian, Emory University

Moderator: Amy Navratil Ciccone, Director of Collection Development, University of Southern California

Art librarians are crafting solutions for preserving important photographic archives associated with archaeological excavations, thereby ensuring their existence into the future. Although these excavations may have been published in reports, the photographs have remained largely hidden.  Usually known to only a handful of scholars and primarily by word of mouth, these images are now being made visible through the use of new technologies and creative collaborations among and within the sponsoring institutions.  Panelists will present case studies detailing how collaborations among library, technical services, and digital media staffs are constructing compelling digital resources for present and future audiences.


Saturday April 27, 2013 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Conference Center 211

1:30pm

Forward Into the Past: Crafting A Digital Future, Curating Our Analog Past

Lightning Round

Moderator: Mark Bresnan, Head of Bibliographic Records, Frick Art Reference Library

Cataloging the Future: Challenges and Opportunities Associated with Unique Digital Collections - Greta Bahnemann, Metadata Coordinator/Assistant Librarian, Minnesota Digital Library, University of Minnesota

The Blue Mountain Project and the Means of Knowing - Sandra Ludig Brooke, Librarian, Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University

Creating a Resource, part 1: Conception, Context, and Curation of the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive - Margaret Culbertson, Director, Kitty King Powell Library, Bayou Bend Collection and Gardens, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Creating a Resource, part 2: Implementation, Standards, and Framework  of the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive - Marie Wise, Librarian and Project Manager, The William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

Digitizing the Gilded Age: Building a Digital Collection at the Frick Art Reference Library and Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives - Sean Leahy, Scholarly Resource & Academic Outreach Librarian, Champlain College

Capturing Images of a Forbidden World:  Preliminary Stages of a Project to Digitize the GDR Poster Collection at George Mason University - Melissa McAfee, Special Collections Librarian, Guelph University

What do a Texas watchmaker, a Minnesota forester, a French avant-garde journalist, a New York gallery owner, and an East German poster artist have in common? They are all, in some way, fodder for the digital projects presented in this session. Six speakers will discuss 5 different projects where computing technology is applied to archival and library materials, records of material culture and works of art. They are all somewhere on the continuum from cataloging to cultural history to digital humanities.  Some, like the Minnesota Digital Library’s Minnesota Reflections and the William J. Hill Texas Artisans and Artists Archive, provide access to visual or textual documents relating to artistic or historical activity in a given state.  Documenting the Gilded Age (NYARC) and Uncovering a Forbidden World (George Mason University), leverage existing collections of art or traditional library materials that reside in the collection of a library or a consortium. Still others, such as the Blue Mountain Project (Princeton University), will provide full-text searchable access to selected journals of the avant-garde era. Funding may be from an individual donor, a government, an institution or a non-profit organization. Among the digitized materials are census records, city directories, exhibition catalogs, journal runs, photographs and posters. The presenters will each give a quick overview of their project and may touch on topics such as audience, best practices, cataloging schema or metadata, collaboration, copyright, evaluation, funding, digital and physical preservation, and the place of a given project in the wider world of digital initiatives.


Saturday April 27, 2013 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Conference Center 107

1:30pm

Queering our Collections: Three Important LGBTQ Archives

Sponsored by Julia Bryan-Wilson, Professor, History of Art, University of California Berkeley

Cruising the Archive at ONE - David Frantz, Curator, ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, University of Southern California

Collecting Anything a Lesbian ever Touched: A Grass Roots Archive - Angela Brinskele, Director of Communications, June Mazer Lesbian Archives, University of California Los Angeles

Tom of Finland, In and Out of L.A. - Marti Pike, Woodbury University Librarian and Volunteer, Tom of Finland Foundation Archives / Allison Wickman, Vice President, Tom of Finland Society, Helsinki, Finland and Toni Rodriguez, San Jose State University SLIS Graduate Student, Tom of of Finland Volunteer 

Moderator: Deborah Evans-Cantrell, formerly Catalog/Reference Librarian, Indianapolis Museum of Art 

Representatives from three of the Los Angeles area’s major LGBTQ collections, the ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at University of Southern California, the Tom of Finland Archives, and the Mazer Lesbian Archives at University of California Los Angeles will present on their LGBTQ collections. These collections have materials and resources dedicated to the art and lives of gay artists, such as posters, art, museum objects and other artifacts from artists’ lives. In the case of Tom of Finland, even Tom’s home is part of the collection, open as a museum and community center housing the Tom of Finland collection. Several of these Los Angeles area collections also have collaborative relationships with living gay artists working in their communities. In these relationships the collection is actively working with artists to gather and preserve the artwork and artifacts of artists’ lives. Each speaker will discuss the unique issues and challenges surrounding their particular collections. Additionally, they will share how such issues have changed or effected how they approach their collections and how these issues have helped them develop future strategies for continued gathering and preservation of collections. The panelists will also share how they see their work being affected by technological change and the need for improved research and access to these unique collections. Each collection panelist will also share how they see their role as information professional to such unique audiences and collections in the past, present, and, most importantly, the future. Together all the panelists will explore issues surrounding the partnerships and collaborations between collections and artists, the marginalization of the LGBTQ community, and the current gains in social understanding and approval for LGBTQ people.


Saturday April 27, 2013 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Conference Center 106

2:30pm

Exhibits Open
Saturday April 27, 2013 2:30pm - 4:15pm
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

3:00pm

Break
Saturday April 27, 2013 3:00pm - 3:15pm
n/a

3:15pm

Plenary: Chon Noriega (Educator, Curator and Director of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center)

Plenary Sponsored by the ARLIS/NA Alternative Voices Fund

“[Chon Noriega] acts as a dynamic, almost as a triggering device, to intercultural dialogue.” -Henry Gamboa, Jr. (artist)

Chon Noriega is Professor in the Cinema and Media Studies program at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Director of the UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center, the nation's most expansive library and archive of materials related to Latino history and culture, and Adjunct Curator at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). He also directs one of the most active academic presses in the University of California system.

Professor Noriega is currently completing a book length study of Puerto Rican multimedia artist Raphael Montañez Ortiz, and a longitudinal study of online and social media strategies among nearly 180 art museums in the United States. 

A recent Los Angeles Times profile* explains that “in recent years [Noriega] has become one of the country's most active curators of Latino and Chicano visual art…He has drawn attention not only to art that hangs in museums and gets hashed over in scholarly tomes but also art that pops up on the walls of Boyle Heights restaurants, below freeway underpasses and in other non-institutionally hallowed spaces.”

In 2008 he co-authored the exhibition catalog for LACMA’s Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement and with Terezita Romo and Pilar Tompkins Rivas made an important contribution to Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980 with L.A. Xicano, a project which presented the artistic contributions of Mexican-American and Chicano artists to American art and to Los Angeles’s artistic development through four interrelated exhibitions: Mapping Another L.A.: The Chicano Art Movement (Fowler Museum); Art Along the Hyphen: The Mexican-American Generation (Autry National Center); Mural Remix: Sandra de la Loza (LACMA); Icons of the Invisible: Oscar Castillo (Fowler Museum). The project was documented in the publication L.A. Xicano (UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press, 2011).

While Noriega’s research interests are diverse, including avant-garde film and video, the conjunction of film and television history, racial, gender and sexual difference within both alternative and national cinemas, they are always situated within a broader public framework. He is involved in ongoing research projects focused on health care access, economic security, education pipeline, and commercial broadcast media and media access for underrepresented groups. He serves on the advisory boards of the UCLA Center for Population Health and Health Disparities in East L.A. and the UCLA Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Equity.

Professor Noriega’s address is certain to resonate with the ARLIS/NA audience, and will touch on his research and experiences curating groundbreaking exhibitions as well as discuss the relationship between the types of activities he does as a scholar and community engaged faculty member and his role as the overseer of a library and archive of international significance.

_________________________________________________

*Chon Noriega's schedule is exhausting by Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times, October 16, 2012


Saturday April 27, 2013 3:15pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom BC

4:00pm

Break
Saturday April 27, 2013 4:00pm - 4:15pm
n/a

4:15pm

In Our Own Back Yard: Library Instruction for Museum Docents

Topic Talk with Q&A hosted by the Museum Libraries Division. Talk will be followed by the regular Division business meeting. All are welcome!

In Our Own Back Yard: Library Instruction for Museum Docents

Presenters:

Linda Seckelson, Principal Reader Services Librarian, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Louis Adrean, Senior Librarian for Research and Public Programs, The Cleveland Museum of Art

Melanie Emerson, Head of Reader Services, The Art Institute of Chicago

As art museums address the realities of diminishing financial resources, museum docents are being relied upon more than ever in an educational capacity.  While art museum librarians are not training docents to become art critics or educators, we do face the challenges of acquainting them with basic research strategies so they can be as effective as possible.

In this short-format presentation, three challenges faced by art librarians who have a role in docent training will be addressed.  Each of presenters will discuss administrative issues, access to resources, and capabilities of docents in three 5-minute segments, along with an overview of their respective library’s role in docent training.  Audience members will then be invited to ask questions and engage in discussion.

 


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Conference Center 107

4:15pm

Power Up! How Can Academic Libraries Collect for Video Game Design Students

Topic Talk with Q&A hosted by the Art & Design School Division. Talk will be followed by the regular Division business meeting. All are welcome!

Power Up! How Can Academic Libraries Collect for Video Game Design Students

Presenter: Olivia Miller, MLIS candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Moderator: Claire Gunning, Art/Architecture Librarian, Cooper Union Library

As video games become increasingly more mainstream their legitimacy as a form of art has solidified. The number of universities offering degrees in video game studies and video game design rises annually and more academic librarians now face the task of collecting for this new, highly interdisciplinary field. Game design patrons are similar to studio artists, but with a technological twist. Many librarians are unfamiliar and uncomfortable with the subject matter and intimidated by the thought of collecting video games and related materials. This talk will summarize a study in which the information behaviors of video game design students are being identified, as a way to shine light on the individual users needs and practices to better collect for this unique user group.


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 4:45pm
Conference Center 106

4:15pm

Art & Design School Division

Art & Design School Division co-moderators: Heather Koopmans and Deborah Evans-Cantrell

The Art & Design School Division is pleased to present a Topic Talk with Q&A in the first half-hour of the meeting. All are welcome!

Power Up! How Can Academic Libraries Collect for Video Game Design Students

Presenter: Olivia Miller, MLIS candidate, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

As video games become increasingly more mainstream their legitimacy as a form of art has solidified. The number of universities offering degrees in video game studies and video game design rises annually and more academic librarians now face the task of collecting for this new, highly interdisciplinary field. Game design patrons are similar to studio artists, but with a technological twist. Many librarians are unfamiliar and uncomfortable with the subject matter and intimidated by the thought of collecting video games and related materials. This talk will summarize a study in which the information behaviors of video game design students are being identified, as a way to shine light on the individual users needs and practices to better collect for this unique user group.


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Conference Center 106

4:15pm

Museum Libraries Division

Museum Libraries Division moderator: Doug Litts

The Museum Libraries Division is pleased to present a Topic Talk with Q&A in the first half-hour of the meeting. All are welcome!

In Our Own Back Yard: Library Instruction for Museum Docents

Presenters:

Linda Seckelson, Principal Reader Services Librarian, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Louis Adrean, Senior Librarian for Research and Public Programs, The Cleveland Museum of Art

Melanie Emerson, Head of Reader Services, The Art Institute of Chicago

As art museums address the realities of diminishing financial resources, museum docents are being relied upon more than ever in an educational capacity.  While art museum librarians are not training docents to become art critics or educators, we do face the challenges of acquainting them with basic research strategies so they can be as effective as possible.

In this short-format presentation, three challenges faced by art librarians who have a role in docent training will be addressed.  Each of presenters will discuss administrative issues, access to resources, and capabilities of docents in three 5-minute segments, along with an overview of their respective library’s role in docent training.  Audience members will then be invited to ask questions and engage in discussion.


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 5:15pm
Conference Center 107

4:15pm

Emerging Technology Forum

Sponsored by The Library, University of California San Diego

Organized by the Professional Development Committee and ArLiSNAP

The Emerging Technology Forum will showcase ways in which information professionals are using new, free, and/or open-source technologies to make their jobs more efficient, their teaching more effective, or their collections more accessible.

Stop by to hear short lighting round presentations and visit technology stations for hands-on demonstrations about Crowdsourcing, If This Then That, Pinterest, Process Delineation/Concept Mapping, Tumblr, Viewshare, and Zotero.

Lightning Round Presentations

Moderator: Elizabeth Lane, Assistant Reference Librarian, Frick Art Reference Library

4:30 start time

If This Then That: Taming the Web Using IFTTT - Caitlin Pereira 

Getting from Chaos to Strategy: Process Delineation in the Digital Age - John Trendler

Tumblr: a How-to - Bettina Smith

Crowdsourcing Projects, from Start to Finish - Mary-Michelle Moore

5:30 start time

Pinterest As More Than a Collection of Images - Shannon Lane 

Building Interfaces to Digital Collections with Viewshare - Jefferson Bailey 

Expanding Zotero's Image Universe: Building translators to harvest our digital collections - Alexander Watkins 

 

If This Then That: Taming the Web Using IFTTT

Caitlin Pereira, Visual Resources Librarian, Massachusetts College of Art and Design

In the age of the smartphone the internet plays such a large role in work and personal lives, but often times essential parts of our digital toolbox don’t play well together, IFTTT can help bring them together. IFTTT, which stands for If This Then That, is a free web-based service that serves as your own personal programmer, creating automated actions between other web and mobile services.  IFTTT can simplify social networking efforts in your institutions, help you keep an ear to the ground on certain topics across the Internet, or just aid in organizing your own digital life. While IFTTT cannot solve all Internet related conundrums, it is easy and flexible enough to remedy a few without breaking a sweat.

 

Getting from Chaos to Strategy: Process Delineation in the Digital Age

John M. Trendler, Curator of Visual Resources, Scripps College

Do you need to create, update or redesign a complex system, or even a simple one? Process delineation is simply putting actions or processes into a visual format. Whether it’s information architecture/wire-framing, a procedural document/digital workflow or a plan for storing your personal music and photos there are tools and techniques that ensure a more complete and efficient delineation of the process. As a visual learner passionate about technology I’ve probably spent too much time forcing concepts and processes into visual form, let me share some of the successful strategies I’ve encountered along the way. You don’t need to be an artist or designer to create helpful visual representations of how things work (or should work), it just requires some practice and patience.

 

Tumblr: a How-to

Bettina C. Smith, Librarian, Digital Projects, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution

An introduction to the micro-blogging platform Tumblr. Launched in 2007, Tumblr is a fast-growing newcomer in the field of blogging and social media. It is a fabulous resource for art librarians and visual resource professionals because it is highly visual, very customizable, and easy to use. Unlike other blogging platforms, Tumblr is uniquely suited to short and sweet posts. This makes it a great tool for anyone who wants to have a blog presence but doesn't have the time to write 300-word posts. I will share tips and tricks of the tumbling trade and you will be on your way to sharing your collections and connecting with your patrons in new ways.

 

Crowdsourcing Projects, from Start to Finish

Mary-Michelle Moore, Library Assistant, Langson Library, UC Irvine / MLIS candidate, Rutgers State University, New Brunswick and Fallon Bleich, Student, Rutgers State University

In our fall poster research we surveyed around 10 librarians associated with museums or libraries who successfully completed a project that featured crowdsourcing, or reaching out to users as an important part of their framing of the project, as a central part of the execution.  Using our contacts from the previous poster endeavor we propose to create a small review of about 3-5 of these projects, chosen by who of our previous contacts are willing to speak with us in depth about their experience.  We hope that by going over a handful of projects we can show the attendees of the conference the way a few projects were conducted and perhaps see some similarities between how crowdsourcing projects for libraries have worked in the past.  Most of the technology we saw in our previous poster research was open source survey-style software that should make for an interesting hands on presentation or poster.

 

Pinterest As More Than a Collection of Images

Shannon Lane, MLIS Candidate, University of California, Los Angeles

The Pinterest platform is most often used for collecting recipes, craft ideas and event planning, but Pinterest can also be more than that. Pinterest offers the unique opportunity to market your library, or institution, with a series of curated images arranged on themed boards of your choosing.  With Pinterest, every item you pin, re-pin or upload can be linked back to your institutions web resources. Not only will this drive more traffic to your web resources, but it will also make your collections and resources available to those who may stumble upon your pins on Pinterest before they think to visit your homepage. This presentation will take a look at an academic library’s Pinterest page that was created with this model in mind.   

 

Building Interfaces to Digital Collections with Viewshare

Jefferson Bailey, Strategic Initiative Manager, Metropolitan New York Library Council

Viewshare is a free, easy-to-use, web-based software platform developed by the National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program (NDIIPP) of the Library of Congress. Viewshare enables collection managers, users, and anyone working with digital content to create multiple, dynamic interfaces that allow new ways of seeing and navigating digital collections. Featuring a simple drag-and-drop interface, multiple tools for managing and enhancing collection data, and an iterative design processes for building visualizations, Viewshare allows for non-technical users to work with the often heterogeneous metadata of cultural heritage organizations. The views created with Viewshare both empower the discovery and understanding of trends and patterns within digital collections and also can be used to quickly prototype collection data for potential use in other discovery and exhibition systems. Most importantly, Viewshare capitalizes on the affordances of richly cataloged items and the unique and detailed contextual knowledge of collection managers to enable the creation of interactive interfaces that form a bridge between curatorial understanding and users' exploratory, generative behavior. 

 

Expanding Zotero's Image Universe: Building translators to harvest our digital collections 

Alexander Watkins, Assistant Professor / Art & Architecture Librarian, University of Colorado Boulder

Beyond citation management, Zotero can be a powerful tool for gathering and organizing images. Users can already pull data and image files from sites like Flickr and Wikimedia Commons. But Zotero's open source and extensible nature makes it possible to expand its repertory of sites with a little bit of coding called a translator. Using a program called Scaffold, translators can be built by librarians with only minimal training. These translators can expand the universe of images and metadata found in digital collections that can be harvested by Zotero users.


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Ballroom A

4:15pm

Exhibits Open with Ice Cream and Frozen Fruit Bars

Sponsored by MARCnow

After a day of sessions, come to the exhibit hall to visit all of the participating vendors, our greatest supporters! Not only will you see fabulous books, ephemera and other products but you can also grab a frozen treat.


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

4:15pm

Poster Session with Ice Cream and Frozen Fruit Bars

Sponsored by MARCnow

Take advantage of a 2-hour Poster Session to learn from and interact with presenters of twenty-six posters covering an array of topics relevant to art librarianship.

TITLES & PRESENTERS (For full Poster descriptions click here)

Artists Books in the Digital Age: Uniting Student, Faculty, Community, and Consortial Collaborators through Grant Money - Rachel Beckwith, Arts Librarian, Hampshire College

The Library as a Stage: Devised Scripts and the Library's Successful Collaboration & Outreach with the Theatre Department - Stephanie Beene, Visual Resources Coordinator, Lewis & Clark College

Writing on the Walls: Entice Your Users To Share Their Thoughts - Sarah Carter and Jennifer Friedman, Instruction and Research Services Librarians, Ringling College of Art + Design

Outreach to Students through Library Displays and Exhibits - Tina Chan, Reference and Instruction Librarian, State University of New York at Oswego

The Artists as Writers Database Project - Farah Chung, Reference Intern, Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD) University

The Views of Rome DH Project: An Art Librarian's Perspective - Kim Collins, Art History Librarian, Emory University

Artwork & Resources, Onsite & Online: AAU Library’s Physical and Virtual Exhibition Program for Students - Abby Dansiger, Visual Resources Librarian, Academy of Art University Library

Full Speed Ahead: the Challenges of Cataloging a Historic Editorial Cartoon Collection - Mary Anne Dyer, Metadata Catalog Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University

The “Weir” Connection: Liaison Work, Student Mentorship, Digitization, Collection Development, and the Art in the Library Exhibition - Christiane Erbolato-Ramsey, Fine Arts Librarian, Brigham Young University

“Chanting as we Speak,” or, Cataloging Special Collections in the Thomas J. Watson Library - Tamara Fultz, Associate Museum Librarian, Thomas J. Watson Library, Metropolitan Museum of Art

Inside/Outside: Outreach at SCAD-Savannah - Patricia Gimenez and Carla-Mae Crookendale, Reference Librarians, Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD)

One Simple Change: Inter-library Lending for a Distance Based Program - Laura Graveline, Visual Arts Librarian, Dartmouth College & The Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts

Library Alchemy: A Workshop for Researching Contemporary Art - Luke Leither, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Utah

Beautiful and Useful: Renovating the Library of Architecture, Design and Construction at Auburn University - Kasia Leousis, Architecture and Art Librarian, Auburn University

Results in the Cloud: Using Web Storage for Auction House Pricelists - Dan Lipcan, Assistant Museum Librarian, Systems & Special Projects and Erika Hauser, Librarian, Collection Development, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Teaching the Arts through Digitized Primary Sources: The University of the Arts and the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources Consortium - Teresa Morales, Independent Arts Educator & Provenance Researcher

History and Identity: Experiments in Creative Institutional Blogging - Sarah Osborne Bender, Cataloguing & Technical Services Librarian, The Phillips Collection

The Art Librarian as Teacher: Information Selection and Evaluation Activities in the Art History and Studio Classroom - Esther Roth-Katz, Graduate Student, Indiana University Bloomington

The Digital Scrolling Paintings Project at the University of Chicago - Amanda Rybin, Associate Director, Visual Resources Center, University of Chicago

To Surf or Boogie Board the Art E-Books Wave? - Kai Alexis Smith, Intern, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University and Kitty Chibnik, Head, Access Services, Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

DIY - Zines, Minicomix, and More at the Art Center College of Design - Gina Solares, Catalog Librarian, Art Center College of Design

Building Oregon: Building Collaborations with a Digital Resource - Edward Teague, Head, Architecture & Allied Arts Library, University of Oregon

Crafting the Message:  the Architecture Library's Marketing Plan - Amy Trendler, Architecture Librarian, Ball State University

Are Pictures Worth 1000 Words? The Impact of Visual Resources on Scholarly Journals, Seen from the Viewpoint of Undergraduate Students’ Educational Interests - Sarah Vornholt, Graduate Student, University of Hawai'i at Manoa

Fill in the Blank (Walls): the Academic Library Art Committee - Terrie Wilson, Art Librarian and Head, Fine Arts Library, Michigan State University

Surveying Users and Setting Goals at the LACMA Research Library - Pauline Wolstencroft, Senior Librarian, Los Angeles County Museum of Art


Saturday April 27, 2013 4:15pm - 6:15pm
Ballroom AB Foyer

5:15pm

Academic Libraries Division

Academic Libraries Division moderator: Lareese Hall


Saturday April 27, 2013 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Conference Center 212/214

5:15pm

Visual Resources Division

Visual Resources Division moderator: Greta Bahnemann


Saturday April 27, 2013 5:15pm - 6:15pm
Conference Center 211

6:00pm

Society Circle Event: Reception at Pasadena home of Betty and Brack Duker

Join fellow Society Circle members for a wine and cheese reception at the private home of renowned local Pasadena collectors Betty and Brack Duker, who specialize in Latin American art from 1940 to 1990. Alma Ruiz, senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art, will also be on hand to discuss the works and answer questions.

Open to current Society Circle members.

If you plan to attend, you must select this event when completing your conference registration. This will serve as your RSVP.

Transportation: Registered attendees will receive a confirmation via email with transportation instructions.


Saturday April 27, 2013 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Off-site location will be provided to attendees

6:00pm

A Night at the Museum: Pasadena Museum of California Art

Walk four blocks from the Pasadena Convention Center to visit the Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA) for a casual evening outing before or after dinner. The PMCA, which will be open just for ARLIS/NA conference attendees, is dedicated to the exhibition of California art, architecture, and design from 1850 to the present. Enjoy three exciting exhibitions and do a little shopping in the museum store!

On View:

California Scene Paintings: from 1930 to 1960

Christopher Miles: Bloom

Meander - Los Angeles-based artist John O'Brien's installation in the PMCA Project Room

Fee: FREE with conference badge

Address: 490 East Union Street, Pasadena, CA, 91101. The museum is located one block north of Colorado Boulevard, between Los Robles and Oakland Avenues. [map]


Saturday April 27, 2013 6:00pm - 9:00pm
PMCA 490 E. Union St., Pasadena, CA, 91101

6:30pm

SEI 10 Year Reunion

Join us at Charlie's Bar in the Sheraton Hotel as we toast the 10th anniversary of SEI!

The Summer Educational Institute for Visual Resources & Image Management, a joint project of ARLIS/NA and the VRA Foundation, has provided educational summer workshops on image management since 2004. The SEI Reunion at the ARLIS/NA conference will celebrate the ten-year anniversary of the program, and anyone who attended SEI, taught a class, or helped organize an institute is invited. Those planning to participate in SEI 2013 or host a future institute are also welcome to attend. Cash bar.


Saturday April 27, 2013 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Charlie's Bar, Sheraton Hotel 303 East Cordova St., Pasadena, CA, 91101

8:30pm

ArLiSNAP Night Out!

The ArLiSNAP Night Out is an informal networking event at a local bar for students and young professionals. Drop in for a few minutes or stay all night. Meet at 8:30 in the hotel lobby and we will make our way to El Cholo Cafe in the Paseo Colorado.

Address: 260 East Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, CA, 91101, in the Paseo Colorado directly across Green Street from the Convention Center. [map]


Saturday April 27, 2013 8:30pm - 12:00am
El Cholo Cafe 260 East Colorado Blvd., Pasadena, CA, 91101
 
Sunday, April 28
 

7:00am

Yoga

Wake up with your ARLIS/NA colleagues and enjoy an energizing yoga practice led by Deborah Ultan Boudewyns. A great way to start off a busy day of conferencing!

 


Sunday April 28, 2013 7:00am - 8:00am
Conference Center 208

7:00am

7:30am

Old Pasadena Walking Tour #1

Leaving from the Sheraton Hotel, Pasadena Heritage Tours will lead the group through Old Pasadena Historic District, now on the National Register of Historic Places. The tour explores the architectural detail of the historic district as well as the struggles and triumphs of preservation and restoration efforts of buildings of landmark highlights such as Memorial Park, (originally called Library Park), Raymond Theater (originally a Beaux Arts style vaudeville theater), and the late 1920s St. Andrews Catholic Church. The tour will cover architecture along the city’s main north-south thoroughfares, Fair Oaks and Raymond Avenues and the city’s most important east-west street, Colorado Boulevard. Exploring the service streets and alleys of the area will provide the best evidences of its Victorian past. Today Old Pasadena, comprised of mostly commercial businesses and some residences, serves as an important model for downtown revitalization.

Maximum Participants: unlimited

Fee: $15

Accessibility: Moderate level of walking.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Sunday April 28, 2013 7:30am - 8:45am
Off-site

7:30am

Old Pasadena Walking Tour #2

Leaving from the Sheraton Hotel, Pasadena Heritage Tours will lead the group through Old Pasadena Historic District, now on the National Register of Historic Places. The tour explores the architectural detail of the historic district as well as the struggles and triumphs of preservation and restoration efforts of buildings of landmark highlights such as Memorial Park, (originally called Library Park), Raymond Theater (originally a Beaux Arts style vaudeville theater), and the late 1920s St. Andrews Catholic Church. The tour will cover architecture along the city’s main north-south thoroughfares, Fair Oaks and Raymond Avenues and the city’s most important east-west street, Colorado Boulevard. Exploring the service streets and alleys of the area will provide the best evidences of its Victorian past. Today Old Pasadena, comprised of mostly commercial businesses and some residences, serves as an important model for downtown revitalization.

Maximum Participants: unlimited

Fee: $15

Accessibility:Moderate level of walking.

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday April 28, 2013 7:30am - 8:45am
Off-site

8:00am

Women and Art SIG

Women and Art SIG coordinator: Melanie Emerson


Sunday April 28, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 207

8:00am

SAHARA Meeting

Organizer: Ann Whiteside


Sunday April 28, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Conference Center 209

8:00am

Leadership Breakfast

Sponsored by F.A. Bernett Books 

By invitation only.


Sunday April 28, 2013 8:00am - 9:00am
Ballroom A

8:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 210 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday April 28, 2013 8:00am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 210

8:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 215 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday April 28, 2013 8:00am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 215

9:00am

Break
Sunday April 28, 2013 9:00am - 9:15am
n/a

9:00am

9:00am

Posters on View

Unattended posters. For full Poster descriptions click here.


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:00am - 3:00pm
Ballroom AB Foyer

9:00am

Self Schedule Room Available

To reserve Conference Center Room 209 for all or part of this time slot, please sign-up on the list provided outside the room door and post the announcement of your meeting on the bulletin board at the Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:00am - 6:30pm
Conference Center 209

9:15am

Doing Data Together: Engaging End-Users in Building Richer Resources, More Efficiently

BWR: Collaborating to Document the World's Built Environment - Carole Ann Fabian, Director, Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University

Your Paintings: The UK's Entire Public Oil Paintings Collection Goes Online For The World To See - Andrew Ellis, Director, The Public Catalogue Foundation

The Getty Scholars' Workspace: Building a Collaborative Online Environment for Research and Publication - Murtha Baca, Head, Digital Art History Access, Getty Research Institute

The Creator as Cataloger: Shared Shelf and Faculty Collections - Vickie O'Riordan, University of California San Diego Library

Moderator: Caroline Caviness, Implementation Manager, ARTstor

Art librarians, visual resources curators, and researchers now operate in a networked, user-centric environment. As a result, end-user collaboration is essential. It provides us with a much broader base of knowledge, ensures that the collections we build are relevant and useful, and helps us, more generally, to keep pace with the larger needs of our communities in libraries, museums, and other research institutions. The question, then-and the challenge-is how to harness the knowledge that lies in these user communities. To do so on a large scale requires collaboration between institutions, and on a smaller scale it also means that we must find a way to leverage the technologies and tools available to us. In this session, Carole Ann Fabian will outline the large-scale multi-institutional collaboration of the Built Works Registry Project (BWR), which brings together the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, ARTstor, and the Getty Research Institute in the effort to build open sharable data resources for cultural heritage objects.  As a networked, distributed environment, BWR will allow contributors from throughout the global community to participate in the development and maintenance of this community-generated resource. Andrew Ellis, Director of Britain's Public Catalogue Foundation, will speak about Your Paintings, a partnership with the BBC to document and photograph all the oil paintings in public ownership in the United Kingdom - over 200,000 works - and involve the public in tagging them. Murtha Baca will discuss the development of Getty Scholars' Workspace, an online digital art history tool for researchers to work collaboratively for research and publication purposes. And Vickie O'Riordan will describe University of California, San Diego Library's efforts to engage users in contributing data to their own archival collections through cataloging and annotation in a web-based environment using Shared Shelf.

 


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:15am - 10:45am
Conference Center 106

9:15am

Gift Horses: Contending with Donated Labor and Library Materials

Donated Materials Policies in Theory and Practice - Karyn Hinkle, Reader Services Librarian, Bard Graduate Center

Rejects and Discards: The Underside of Collection Development - Christina Peter, Head, Acquisitions, Frick Art Reference Library

I Don’t Do Copying: Structuring a Meaningful Library Internship - Jacqueline Protka, Digital Assets Librarian & Media Coordinator, Corcoran Gallery and College of Art + Design

Is It Worth It? Issues of Volunteer Time and Personnel Management in the Museum Library - Traci Timmons, Librarian, Seattle Art Museum

Moderator: Karyn Hinkle, Reader Services Librarian, Bard Graduate Center

The session comprises four papers on accepting book donations, coping with donated materials, managing volunteers, and working with library interns. The presenters will discuss the benefits of such "free" gifts as well as the stress they can create if not handled properly, and will offer advice on how to manage intern, volunteer, and donation programs to a library’s best advantage. We will consider the ethics involved: Is it appropriate to ask library science interns to perform everyday library tasks, or should they be assigned special projects? What is your institution's policy on selling unwanted book donations? What strategies have you used to let go of volunteers who were not working out? These interrelated topics should appeal to art librarians in both museum and academic library settings, and they pertain to those working in library administration and in collection development. “Gifts” of labor, materials, and collections will always be a part of our libraries. Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth? We will look the gift horses of volunteers, donations, and interns not only in the mouth but all around on all angles and will provide tools for making the most of them in our libraries.


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:15am - 10:45am
Conference Center 211

9:15am

Installation Art and Library Collections: Origin, Outreach, and Collaboration

“Light is, itself, the revelation”: The Installations and Rare Books of James Turrell - Megan Oliver, Assistant Librarian, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art and Arwen Spinosa, Cataloging Librarian, The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art

James Turrell’s Skyspace "The Way of Color": Bridging Community, University and Regional Libraries to a New Museum of American Art- Catherine Petersen, Library Director, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

An Academic Library's Collection of Distinction Bolsters University and Community Public Art Programs - Deborah Ultan Boudewyns, Arts, Architecture & Landscape Architecture Librarian, The University of Minnesota

Off the Shelf and into the Gallery: Engaging the User through Installation Art - Emilie Mathews, Interim Director, The Fine Arts Library, Indiana University and Sylvia Page, MLS Candidate in Art Librarianship at Indiana University

Moderator: Nicole Beatty, Arts & Humanities Librarian, Weber State University

This session will focus on the development of library collections on installation and public art in response to and in collaboration with museums, universities, and active local communities. Each speaker will highlight an installation piece or program that demonstrates how their collection strategies and library services function to bridge their art and programs with corresponding institutions and the surrounding community. Installation art works contribute greatly to museum and university campuses by continually updating the [sometimes unspoken] discourse experienced by patrons, students, curators, faculty and staff. Librarians respond to this discourse by crafting collections that will support the installations with well-informed, substantial scholarly resources.

Megan Oliver will lead the discussion by introducing one of James Turrell’s latest installations “Joseph’s Coat”, the new Skyspace at The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida. At over 3,000 square feet, the Skyspace on the Ringling Estate is one of the largest Turrell has created and is a unique sensory piece. Discussing the impact of the Skyspace on the museum campus, the history of Turrell’s Skyspace construction, and the importance of the Turrell research collection is vital to understanding this installation artwork. By obtaining monies from the Florida State University Faculty Research Library grant, the Ringling Museum Library has formed a Turrell book collection that supports research on this installation art, and its place in the oeuvre of all things James Turrell.

Catherine Petersen will discuss James Turrell’s Skyspace at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas. Commissioned two years before the Museum was completed, “The Way of Color” was a daring introduction to art considering the rather small, rural community. And yet the work played a pivotal role in crafting the future for engaging community discourse and support for the visual arts. “The Way of Color” not only spurred interdisciplinary dialogue among a new and curious audience, but also greatly contributed to the success of a new museum and library. Petersen collaborated with regional libraries and the University of Arkansas Libraries to build circulating collections that would forge bridges between the university, museum of art and the community. Today, museum guests and community members alike populate the campus trails, galleries and the library’s third floor space.

Deborah Ultan Boudewyns will focus on the active public art programs in the Twin Cities, including the Northern Sparks Festival on the University of Minnesota campus. She will discuss what makes the public art and installation art library collection distinctive, and how it supports the innovative community-oriented art program and participating departments and colleges on campus. The acquisition of the Forecast Public Art archives and the digitization of their publication Public Art Review is one example of the library’s goal to support a pronounced interest in installation and public art.

Emilee Mathews and Sylvia Page will present on how installation artist Buzz Spector has created an exhibit made entirely of books for Indiana University’s Grunwald Gallery. This is the first time the artist has worked with a library to obtain the nearly 10,000 books necessary for an exhibition of this scale. The Fine Arts Library is playing an integral, multifaceted role in this project. As the liaison between the Gallery and the IU Library system, they have been working to plan outreach events that highlight local resources. The discursive nature of the artwork provides the potential for their users to encounter and consider core library issues through the familiar format of visual art. Using the feedback they garner from their users, they will craft a more cohesive partnership between the Fine Arts Library and its constituency, thus ensuring a more secure, yet innovative future.

This session will further the discussion on the challenges associated with developing resourceful collections in order to serve resident installation art and public art programs on campuses. How can our collections be responsive to museum-goers, university students, and our communities that may or may not recognize installation art as art?  If the art is seamlessly integrated into the fabric of the campus, how might these collections function to support, inform, and encourage deeper inquiry?  How do we provide outstanding services and collection navigation with reduced staff, reduced hours and/or resources? In what ways does the art enhance conversations at and use of the library? How can we use our art and library collaborative projects to pursue more opportunities for community partnerships and engagement?


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:15am - 10:45am
Conference Center 212/214

9:15am

The Visual Language of Data: Reshaping Humanities Research

Sponsored by California Digital Library, Office of the President, University of California

An Emerging Aesthetic: An Introduction to Information Visualization - Lily Pregill, Project Coordinator & Systems Manager, New York Art Resources Consortium

From Interface to Analysis: Visualizing Digital Collections - Jefferson Bailey,  Strategic Initiative Manager, Metropolitan New York Library Council

Patterns of Collecting: InfoVis for Art History - Christian Huemer, Managing Editor, The Getty Provenance Index®, Getty Research Institute

Moderator: Jennifer Tobias, Reader Services Librarian, The Museum of Modern Art

Data visualization, as part of the broader field of digital humanities, has allowed museum curators, collection managers, and scholars to algorithmically analyze art information in novel, dynamic ways. Shifting palettes, spatial density, and other material aspects of works can now be examined digitally and can provide new insights into creativity, form, genre, and evolution. Cultural heritage professionals are also beginning to use visualizations and computational tools to expand the availability and explorability of their collections. This session will provide an overview of the field of information visualization and will examine how data visualization and its related technologies are increasingly mediating formal humanities research and the study of collections. Additionally, the session will discuss how new tools and methods of visualizing data are empowering patron use of digital and digitized art and artist collections.


Sunday April 28, 2013 9:15am - 10:45am
Conference Center 107

10:45am

Break
Sunday April 28, 2013 10:45am - 11:00am
n/a

11:00am

Character through Costume: Production Research and Costume Design for Film and Television

Sponsored by the Margaret Herrick Library, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Researching Film Costume Design at the Margaret Herrick Library - Anne Coco, Graphic Arts Librarian, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Serving the Story at the Western Costume Research Library - Bobi Garland, Director, Western Costume Research Library and Archive

Moderator: Lindsay M. King, Public Services Librarian and Liaison to the School of Drama, Yale University

This session will explore production research for film, with a focus on costume design and related library collections in the Los Angeles area, but will also address applications for reference and collection development related to costume in more general library collections. How do costume designers find the wide range of images and materials that serve as inspiration and technical background for productions? What combination of high-tech and low-tech tools do designers use in doing production research, sharing visual ideas, documenting productions, etc.? How are costume designers unique library users, and what can librarians do to better serve this group of patrons?


Sunday April 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 211

11:00am

Copyright and Images: An Evolving Landscape and New Opportunities

Sponsored by the Berkeley Law Library University of California

Moderator: Sonja Staum, Director, Herron Art Library, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and Member of the ARLIS/NA Public Policy Committee.

On behalf of the ARLIS/NA Public Policy committee, Sonja will give a brief update on the committee's major activities for the year, including the Society's recent institutional membership with the Center for Intellectual Property.

Speaker: Maureen Whalen is the Associate General Counsel for the J. Paul Getty Trust; she specializes in acquisitions and intellectual property matters. In 2008 and 2009, Whalen co-chaired of the Legal Issues in Museum Administration course of study sponsored by ALI-ABA, the Smithsonian Institution, and the American Association of Museums. She was a member of the Section 108 Study Group convened by the Library of Congress in 2005. She taught Art & Museum Law at Southwestern Law School and Intellectual Property Law for Librarians and Archivists at the University of California, Los Angeles. She writes about the importance of capturing Rights Metadata, including her most recent publication of a rights metadata dictionary. In 2009, she received the Gerd Muehsam Award for her paper What's Wrong With This Picture? An Examination of Art Historians' Attitudes About Electronic Publishing Opportunities and the Consequences of Their Continuing Love Affair with Print. Prior to joining the Trust in 2000, Whalen spent more than twenty years in the cable television industry, including more than twelve years at The Walt  Disney Company. She received her undergraduate and law degrees from the State University of New York at Buffalo, and a Masters of Library and Information Science from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Session Description: The ever changing landscape of technological developments, access strategies, digitization initiatives and intersection with copyright law/policy has often presented image managers with challenging copyright issues and perplexing solutions. Much of the historical conversation about copyright in the image management arena has centered on the role of the federal copyright statute and how image mangers can make policy choices within this framework. This fundamental statutory approach in addressing copyright through policy development is helpful. However, beyond the statutory considerations are the application of community practices, risk management strategies and an understanding of pertinent judicial decisions.

This presentation will review recent developments and current information, such as the Visual Resources Association: Statement on the Fair Use of Images for Teaching, Research and Study, and pertinent judicial decisions pertaining to the use of images, with planned audience interaction with Q&A.


Sunday April 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 106

11:00am

Librarian/Faculty Collaboration in Teaching and Assessing Information Literacy Across the Curriculum: Successes and Challenges

Sponsored by Kimbrough Library, Ringling College of Art and Design

Speakers:

Sue Maberry, Director of Library  and Instructional Technology, Otis College of Art and Design

Debra Ballard, English faculty and Chair of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Otis College of Art and Design

Parme Giuntini, Art Historian and Director of Art History, Otis College of Art and Design

Moderator: Jennifer Friedman, Instruction and Research Services Librarian, Verman Kimbrough Memorial Library, Ringling College of Art + Design

At Otis College of Art and Design, Information Literacy became an important learning objective
more than 15 years ago. Initially librarians made one-shot research presentations and, for a time, taught a one-unit course. Over the years, the leadership of the Library and the Liberal Arts and Sciences department developed a strong collaborative relationship, one that allowed us to refine our teaching practices and embed instruction in courses. The Library and core faculty worked together to identify specific outcomes and develop curriculum modules (including assignments and online tutorials) that addressed research needed in courses. Over the past five years we have observed significant shifts in how students are defining, finding, and using information. This, along with Information Literacy’s identification as one of the five core accreditation competencies renewed our efforts to assess and improve the program. Through continual discussions and evaluation, we concluded that more work was needed. In fall of 2011 we initiated two new embedded Information Literacy modules, "Guided Research" and an I-Search Paper in core courses. What we have discovered is that along with the wealth of research help available on the Library website, it was also effective to allot sufficient library time for supervised hands-on research. None of this would be possible without the collaborative working relationship between the library and faculty. Each of us will share needs, obstacles, successes, and continuing challenges from our own disciplinary perspective about how interdisciplinary collaboration has benefited our programs.


Sunday April 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 107

11:00am

Social Media 'Sewing Circle'

Moderator: Nedda Ahmed, Arts Librarian, Georgia State University Library

Let's talk social media! Have you started a Pinterest board for your library? Are you experimenting with Twitter? Or are you completely befuddled on how to use social media in your professional life? We'll cover some of the recent literature on social media in libraries (and beyond), then discuss trends and ideas, sprinkled with attendee show & tell. This session will be loosely structured and discussion-based, so come prepared to participate!


Sunday April 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 212/214

12:00pm

Break
Sunday April 28, 2013 12:00pm - 12:15pm
n/a

12:15pm

Membership Lunch with Special Speaker, Alan Hess (Local Historian and Architect)

Sponsored by EBSCO

Gather with ARLIS/NA members for lunch with Alan Hesslocal historian and architect.

If you plan to attend, you must select this event and your meal choice when completing your conference registration. This will serve as your RSVP.

Fee: $25

"The New History of Old Modernism"

Hess' talk will cover recent scholarship, including the Getty's architecture exhibition Overdrive: L.A. Constructs the Future, 1940-1990, that is broadening the way we see 20th century Modern architecture.

Hess is an architect, author, critic, lecturer and advocate for twentieth century architectural preservation. He researches and documents the emerging suburban metropolises of the West.

He is the author numerous books that document and interpret mid-century, popular, suburban, and Modern architecture on roadside architecture, fifties coffee shop architecture, Las Vegas, Ranch Houses, organic architecture in addition to monographs on Frank Lloyd Wright, Oscar Niemeyer, John Lautner and Julius Shulman.

As an architecture critic, he has written a column for the San Jose Mercury News since 1986.

His writing has also appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Architecture, Architectural Digest, Architectural Record and other journals.

Hess has been active in the preservation of roadside and post war architecture, working to ensure that the nation’s oldest McDonald’s drive-in (Downey, CA), Bullock’s department store (Pasadena) and Edward Durell Stone’s Stuart Pharmaceutical Factory (Pasadena, 1958) qualified for the National Register of Historic Places.

He received numerous honors, awards, and grants: a National Trust for Historic Preservation Honor Award for his efforts to preserve the McDonald's; a California Preservation Foundation President’s Award, and a Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts grant to research the work of Brazilian landscape architect Roberto Burle Marx.

Hess was a National Arts Journalism Program Fellow at Columbia University's School of Journalism in New York and has taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SciArc) and The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

He has given lectures at the Getty Research Institute, The Cooper Hewitt Museum, the Walker Art Museum, and UCLA, among others.

He has also appeared on the CBS Sunday Morning News, CNN, Good Morning America, BBC-TV’s Late Show, NPR’s Morning Edition, California Public Radio’s California Reports, and other programs.



Sunday April 28, 2013 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Ballroom DE

12:15pm

1:15pm

Membership Meeting

Please join your colleagues at the annual membership meeting and show your support as the new officers of the Executive Board take office. The meeting will feature updates on society activities, a financial report, a preview of the 2014 conference in Washington, DC, a forum for discussion, and much more. 


Sunday April 28, 2013 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Ballroom BC

2:15pm

Break
Sunday April 28, 2013 2:15pm - 2:30pm
n/a

2:15pm

2:30pm

Bring Your Own Conference (BYOC)

Moderators:

Sarah Carter, Instruction and Research Services Librarian, Ringling College of Art + Design 

Jill Luedke, Art Librarian, Temple University

Sometimes the most intriguing exchanges at conferences happen outside formal, planned sessions. Now there’s a gathering space for these discussions! The Bring Your Own Conference (BYOC) session is an opportunity for attendees to share their thoughts and learn from others in an "unconference" format. Participants will decide the content and structure using Open Space Technology. You should arrive at this session ready to participate alongside other attendees - do an impromptu show and tell about projects at your institution, continue conversations started at earlier conference venues, or just talk about the challenges libraries will face in the future. Come to this session prepared to discuss topics you are passionate about, ideas which have been incubating inside your head, and problems on which you need to get perspective.

Check out conversation starters on the session wiki and follow the Twitter hashtag #arlisbyoc13


Sunday April 28, 2013 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Ballroom A

2:30pm

Fashion Blogs from Creation to Preservation

Off the Cuff: How Fashion Bloggers Find and Use Information - Kimberly Detterbeck, Art Librarian, Purchase College, SUNY / Marie Sciangula, Assistant Director, Teaching, Learning, and Technology Center, Purchase College, SUNY / Nicole LaMoreaux, Evening Librarian, LIM College and Reference Assistant, Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY

Advanced Style - Ari Seth Cohen, Creator, Advanced Style Blog

Project Archive: The Preservation of Fashion Blogs with Archive-It - Lisa Ryan, Reference and Instruction Librarian, LIM College

Moderator: Suz Massen, Chief of Public Services, Frick Art Reference Library

This session will provide an inside look into fashion blogs, from research and creation to preservation.  Kimberly Detterbeck, Marie Sciangula, and Nicole LaMoreaux have recently completed research regarding the information seeking behaviors and research methods of fashion bloggers. This segment of the presentation will offer an enlightening exploration of how bloggers function as researchers and knowledge creators, a population not yet explored in librarianship. Ari Seth Cohen is the creator of Advanced Style, a blog devoted “to capturing the sartorial savvy of the senior set". Seth-Cohen will discuss the sources of his inspiration which led to the documentation and creation of a blog, a book, and a film about fashionable older women. Finally, Lisa Ryan will discuss LIM College's use of Archive-It to preserve both the college’s website and a collection of fashion blogs. She will examine the challenges and opportunities presented by preserving a medium (the web) and subject matter (fashion) that are both inherently ephemeral.


Sunday April 28, 2013 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Center 212/214

2:30pm

Non Nobis Solum: Building Cultural Heritage Collections Together

Sponsored by California Digital Library, Office of the President, University of California

Turning Patrons into Teammates: Collaborating with Faculty and Students to Describe Images in Shared Shelf - Jennifer Martinez Wormser, Library Director, Laguna College of Art + Design

Beyond Borders: Sharing Resources in a Consortial Setting - Susan Thalmann, Curator of Visual Resources, Pomona College and John Trendler, Curator of Visual Resources, Scripps College

CA State Library's Local History Digital Resources Project: Cultural Collections Using CONTENTdm to Create a Consistent Product for the Online Archive of California - Trudy Levy, Consultant, Califa (retired) and Image Consulting Cooperative

AccessCeramics: A Global, Collaborative, Approach to Building a High-Quality Collection of Ceramic Arts Images - Stephanie Beene,Visual Resources Coordinator, Lewis and Clark College

Moderator: Maureen Burns, IMAGinED Consulting

Not for ourselves alone, an ancient dictum that resonates in the digital world. Technology developments have led to a number of exciting collaborative models and innovative electronic tools to build, share, and discover cultural heritage materials online. Although aggregating digital collections and providing standardized descriptive information have been the core work of information professionals for several decades, now web- and cloud-based applications, open access, digital curation, remote storage, and preservation initiatives provide unprecedented opportunities to involve our patrons in these efforts. This panel will discuss a range of electronic tools enabling systems and workflows to be scaled into productive partnerships and collaborative networks involving a number of players. Artists and archivists, public librarians and visual resources curators, educators and students can all be enlisted to curate, contribute, and describe images and text-based materials of interest to the educational community. Such intra- and inter-institutional alliances provide notable models for expanding the ways we collect, publish, preserve, and access educational content and cultural heritage collections. They are not without their challenges, which the presenters will also discuss. Yet, engaging a broader public in this work increases awareness of what we do and why we do it. It also extends the reach of archives, libraries, museums, and visual resources collections into the community and demonstrates the value of this work to academic enterprise.

 


Sunday April 28, 2013 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Center 107

2:30pm

To the Front! Bringing Collections and Librarian Expertise into User Communities and the Classroom

Lightning Round

Moderator: Stephanie Grimm, Reference & Instruction Librarian, University of South Carolina Beaufort

Making it Relevant to Them: An Architecture-Specific Approach to Teaching an Information Literacy Course - Barret Havens, Outreach Librarian, Woodbury University and Cathryn Ziefle, Architecture Librarian, Woodbury University

Crafting Hybrid Library/Studio Courses to Enhance the Arts Curriculum - Yuki Hibben, Assistant Head of Special Collections and Archives, Virginia Commonwealth University Libraries 

Building New Bridges through Book Arts - Sha Towers, Fine Arts Librarian, Baylor University

Ways of Seeing: Teaching and Learning with Photography - Amanda Brown, Special Collections Instruction Librarian, University of Colorado at Boulder

What’s Authority Without an Author? Zines As an Entry to Information Literacy - Kelly McElroy, Undergraduate Services Librarian, University of Iowa

Incorporating Graphic Narratives into Online Instruction - Caitlin Plovnick, Reference Assistant, UC Irvine; Librarian, Touro University Worldwide and Jeffra Bussmann, STEM/Web Librarian, California State University, East Bay

Connecting Collections: Using Comics for Programming and Outreach in Museum Libraries - Leah High, Public Services Librarian, Nolan Library, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Comics in the Curriculum: Development, Outreach, and Support - Karen Green, Ancient & Medieval History and Religion Librarian, Graphic Novels Librarian, Columbia University

Touching on ideas of outreach and specialized literacy instruction, this dynamic lightning session will feature eight speakers utilizing primary documents; artists books, zines, and other objets d’art; and new and social media in the service of their user communities. Beyond the studio, these materials offer the potential to reach new audiences. Comics about science, medicine, or civil rights movements, along with comics and zines framed in historical context or acting as primary sources, allow librarians to integrate a visual medium with traditionally non-visually-oriented subjects, and to provide examples of non-canonical viewpoints. Book arts and bookmaking provide a bridge between the library and studio, while expertise in studio subjects allow a librarian to better integrate and embed in the classroom and provide highly specialized and relevant instruction to their students. Cathryn Ziefle and Barret Havens will present a model for specialized, curriculum-integrated information literacy courses for architecture students. Yuki Hibben will discuss a team-teaching hybrid library/studio courses that integrate library collections into the art curriculum. Sha Towers will explore the potential of the artists’ book collection as a tool for outreach and instruction. Amanda Brown will focus on the development of course-integrated instruction utilizing photographic materials held in special collections, including instruction targeted towards the sciences. Kelly McElroy will examine the use of zines and zine making in teaching information literacy skills. Caitlin Plovnick will discuss the use of graphic narratives in instruction- in particular, "making" comics for instruction. Leah High will speak on the outreach and programmatic aspects of comics collections in museum libraries. Karen Green will speak on how the comics medium can be used in teaching and outreach, specifically in non-studio-arts coursework including Narrative Medicine.

 


Sunday April 28, 2013 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Conference Center 211

4:00pm

Exhibits Closing Reception

Sponsored by RAM Publications + Distribution

Join us in the Exhibits Area for refreshments and an exciting Silent Auction!


Sunday April 28, 2013 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

4:00pm

Silent Auction in Exhibits

Come bid on chapter baskets, a variety of handmade arts and other donated items at the silent auction! This year, the money raised will help fund ARLIS/NA student travel awards. Grab a snack and a drink during the exhibits closing reception while you ponder your winning bid!

 


Sunday April 28, 2013 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Conference Center Lower Level 101-105

4:30pm

Systems Meet-up

This is an open forum to discuss ILSs, emerging library service platforms, discovery layers, other systems (Drupal, Omeka, ContentDM, etc.), integration, challenges, successes, etc.  Results from an ARLIS/NA systems survey will be presented.

Organizer: Lily Pregill, NYARC Project Coordinator & Systems Manager, Frick Art Reference Library


Sunday April 28, 2013 4:30pm - 5:30pm
Conference Center 211

5:30pm

5:30pm

Graphic Novels SIG

Graphic Novels SIG coordinator: Tara Smith


Sunday April 28, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 208

5:30pm

MARCnow User Group
Sunday April 28, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 212/214

5:30pm

SCIPIO User Group
Sunday April 28, 2013 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Conference Center 207

5:30pm

Break
Sunday April 28, 2013 5:30pm - 7:00pm
n/a

7:00pm

Convocation with Keynote Speaker, Piotr Adamczyk (Google Cultural Institute)

Gather with fellow attendees in the beautiful and historic Pasadena Civic Auditorium for keynote speaker, Piotr Adamczyk, Program Manager, Google Cultural Institute and to celebrate the accomplishments of our members and the progress of our organization. President Deborah Kempe will preside and travel awards, book awards and the Distinguished Service Award will be presented.

"Google's Cultural Institute - What's Google up to?"

Google has a mission to organize and provide access to the world's information. Efforts with the cultural sector like the Art Project and Cultural Institute Platform use a combination of Google technologies and expert information provided by our partners to create unique online experiences. Building these projects requires a deep understanding of library, archival, and museum practices and standards as well as providing tools that can be used by a wide array of partners at different stages of cataloging and digitization. So, how are we doing? We'll discuss reactions to the work so far, present some of our latest attempts to do more with cultural heritage online, and talk about how Google would like to engage with cultural partners.

Piotr Adamczyk has been exploring the possibilities for exchange between practices in the sciences and evaluation techniques from the arts. With a background in Mathematics and Computer Science, Piotr holds graduate degrees in Human Factors and Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Starting with an analyst position with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as the Data Lead for the Google Art Project, and now on the Content Team of the Google Cultural Institute, Piotr's work is focused on the use of open/linked data in cultural heritage institutions.

A reception will follow: Enjoy drinks and refreshments on the outdoor terrace on what promises to be a balmy Southern California evening.



Sunday April 28, 2013 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Pasadena Civic Auditorium

8:30pm

Convocation Reception

Co-sponsored by Sotheby's Institute of Art and ProQuest

Mingle with friends new and old in the gracious and historic Pasadena Civic Auditorium and on its outdoor terrace. Refreshments will be served.



Sunday April 28, 2013 8:30pm - 10:00pm
Pasadena Civic Auditorium
 
Monday, April 29
 

7:00am

8:00am

Historic Downtown Los Angeles Walking Tour with the L.A. Conservancy

We will travel by Metro Gold Line from Pasadena to downtown Los Angeles. At 9:00 we will meet a Los Angeles Conservancy docent at Angels Flight to begin this walking tour. "The Historic Downtown tour provides an overview of the historical and cultural landmarks of downtown Los Angeles. Covering a wide range of architectural styles, and including anecdotes about the people behind the buildings, this tour is a great way to become acquainted (or re-acquainted) with the unique character of downtown Los Angeles.  Historic Downtown, as the area around Pershing Square is known, is the heart of downtown. Some of the most beloved Los Angeles landmarks are in this area, such as the Central Library, Angels Flight, and the Bradbury Building. The history of the area goes back to the founding of the city in 1781, and its architecture tells the story of the growth of the city from the 1890s to the present, including the current trend of conversions of vintage office buildings into loft-style apartments and condos.” The walking tour will end in time to take the Metro back to the Sheraton Hotel to arrive at 1:30.

Note: This same tour will also be given on Friday, April 26, from 8:00 am – 1:00 pm.

Maximum Participants: 45

Fee:  $35

Accessibility:  Challenging level of walking. All participants will be on their feet (walking /standing) for the duration of the tour.  Although there are occasional benches, there is no time that the tour sits down as a whole.  No strenuous steps or hills. A distance of 1 ¾ miles will be covered over the course of the walking tour. Tour is wheelchair accessible. 

Note: Participants should meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Monday April 29, 2013 8:00am - 1:30pm
Off-site

8:30am

The Gamble House (Tour #1)

By bus from the Sheraton Hotel we will travel a short distance to begin our day at 9:00 with a 2 ½ hour docent-led “Behind the Velvet Ropes” tour of Greene & Greene’s Gamble House. "On this tour you are invited behind the scenes to visit parts of the House (otherwise unavailable to the public). You walk inside the rooms and, with flashlight in hand, examine at close quarters exquisite craftsman details. You have time to appreciate the ambience of this National Historic Landmark.” The experienced and passionate docent will share excitement and knowledge as we explore details of the architecture not normally seen from a distance.  We will enjoy box lunches on the patio, followed by a 1 ¼ hours guided walk with a Gamble House docent through the historic Arroyo Terrace neighborhood. This National Register historic district has nine Greene & Greene houses as well as the works of other noted architects such as Myron Hunt, Edwin Bergstrom, Elmer Grey, and D. M. Renton. Among these are the personal residences of Myron Hunt and of Charles Greene. The tour will also stop to admire the elegant gates of Westmoreland Place. The walking tour will proceed rain or shine.  The bus will pick up the group at 3:00 at the Gamble House, make a stop to pick up the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Tour and return to the Sheraton Hotel at 4:00. 

Maximum Participants: 10

Tour Fee: $110 

Accessibility: Challenging level of activity. The house is three-stories with stairs with handrails access only. Walkers with tips and canes are welcome.   

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Monday April 29, 2013 8:30am - 4:00pm
Off-site

8:30am

The Getty Villa

Sponsored by The Getty Research Institute

Depart from the Sheraton Hotel by bus to the Getty Villa in Malibu, the original location of the J. Paul Getty Museum. The Villa re-opened in early 2006 with a new mission as an educational center and museum dedicated to the arts and cultures of ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria. The day will include a private tour of the Getty Villa, including a curator-led tour of the special exhibition, Sicily: Art and Invention between Greece and Rome. The second part of the day will include a behind-the-scenes tour with an Education Specialist who will talk about the highlights and history of the Villa, including the architecture, the garden, and the renovated Ranch House, which was the original residence of J. Paul Getty. You will have several hours of free time to have lunch on your own in the café, wander the site, and see the views before meeting at 3:30 to take the bus back to the Sheraton.

Maximum Participants: 50

Fee: $65

Accessibility: Easy level of walking. Tour will include a lot of standing. Ramps and elevators are available throughout. 

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Monday April 29, 2013 8:30am - 5:30pm
Off-site

8:30am

NACO and RDA: Building Authority Records with the New Cataloging Rules

Instructor:

Sherman Clarke, Freelance and Itinerant Art Cataloger

Name authority work is an essential part of cataloging and NACO (name authority cooperative) is a means to share your authority work with the world. NACO is one of the constituent programs of the Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC), coordinated from the Library of Congress. The Art NACO cooperative has been in existence since 1993 and includes about a dozen libraries, some of whom are inactive. Continued participation will require upgrading skills to comply with RDA rules and changing PCC/NACO procedures. Existing NACO libraries will take online tutorials developed by PCC and LC before March 2013 and go through a review process. Several art catalogers have indicated an interest in joining Art NACO. This workshop will be aimed at the new participants as well as giving current participants a chance to refresh their skills for RDA. Workshop materials will be aimed at those with experience building MARC bibliographic records and using authorized headings from the LC Name Authority File.

Maximum Participants: 25

Fee: $50

Location: Art Center College of Design (North Campus) - 1700 Lida St., Pasadena, CA, 91103. [map]

Transportation is by hired bus. Attendees should meet in the lobby at 7:50 a.m. for an 8:00 a.m. departure. If you plan to drive yourself to/from Art Center College of Design and will not travel with the group, please contact Cathy Billings cbillings@ci.glendale.ca.us. For more information registered attendees should refer to the detailed instructions that were provided via email. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.

SCHOLARSHIPS! A generous donor is funding four scholarships for this workshop. For more information and application instructions click here. Applications are due March 15. If you are selected as a recipient your $50 registration fee will be refunded.


Monday April 29, 2013 8:30am - 5:30pm
Art Center College of Design - North Campus 1700 Lida St., Pasadena, CA, 91103

9:00am

CPAC Debrief Meeting
Monday April 29, 2013 9:00am - 10:00am
Soleil Room, Sheraton Hotel

9:00am

Hands-on Letterpress Broadside Printing Workshop at Archetype Press

Instructor: Gloria Kondrup, Professor and Director, Archetype Press, Art Center College of Design

Plan to get hands-on in this participatory workshop where you will print a broadside and be exposed to the cultural history and heritage of typography and print culture.

Archetype Press, a unique resource for the college and the community, is Art Center’s letterpress printing facility. Archetype Press was created in 1989 by former director Vance Studley and offers students an opportunity to learn and practice what has become a rarity: setting type and printing by hand.

Archetype’s collection of rare American and European metal foundry type, wood type and ornaments—originally belonging to Vern Simpson’s legendary typesetting shop in Hollywood—is the largest in California, and one of the largest of any design school in the country. The extensive metal and wood type collection resides in 2,500 antique wooden drawers. Students learn to set and print type on an impressive set of printing presses: nine Vandercook proof presses, a Chandler & Price platen press, and a Heidelberg Windmill press.

Maximum Participants: 18

Fee:  $50

Address: Art Center College of Design (South Campus) - 950 South Raymond Avenue, Pasadena, CA, 91105. South Campus is 1.2 miles from the Sheraton Hotel. [map]

Transportation: Attendees are responsible for their own transportation to/from the workshop location, which is 1.2 miles from the Sheraton hotel. Walking and taxis are both viable options. Walkers should meet in the Sheraton lobby at 8:15 a.m. for departure shortly thereafter. For more information, including maps, registered attendees should refer to the detailed instructions that were provided via email. Note: If you plan to drive yourself to/from Art Center College of Design South Campus please contact Cathy Billings cbillings@ci.glendale.ca.us. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.

 



Monday April 29, 2013 9:00am - 1:00pm
Art Center College of Design - South Campus 950 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena, CA, 91105

9:00am

ONE Archives, Outfest Legacy Project, and UCLA’s Clark Library, Chicano Studies Research Center and Special Collections - CANCELED

THIS TOUR HAS BEEN CANCELED.

By bus from the Sheraton Hotel, we begin our day at ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, the oldest active Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Questioning (LGBTQ) organization in the United States and the largest repository of LGBTQ materials in the world, part of the University of Southern California (USC) libraries.  

Back on the bus for another 10 minutes, we arrive at the William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, a University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) rare books and manuscripts library that is 13 miles east of the main campus. The collection’s particular strengths are in English literature and history (1641-1800), fine printing, and the world’s most comprehensive collection materials by and relating to Oscar Wilde and his circle.

We continue on the bus to main campus of UCLA, to learn about the Outfest Legacy Project. A collaboration between Outfest and the UCLA Film & Television Archive began in 2005. “The only program of its kind in the world, the Outfest Legacy Project is aimed at the growing crisis in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender moving image archiving. Many of the landmark LGBT films produced over the last 30 years are already in danger of fading away, their original exhibition prints in tatters, their negatives in woeful storage conditions…or even lost.”

Then we'll visit the Chicano Studies Research Center, the first library in the United States to focus on the Mexican-descent population. Today, it is considered to hold among the most important national and international research collections in existence on the Chicana and Chicano experience with holdings of monographs, periodicals, subject files, dissertations and theses, as well as original prints by Chicana/o artists, films, videotapes, audio recordings, slides, and over 120 archival and manuscript collections. The Center’s director Chon Noriega, Professor of Film, Television, and Digital Media will be the Saturday Plenary Session speaker during the conference.

The tour continues with a look at a LGBTQ-related selection of archival collections in UCLA’s Special Collections including the Mazer Lesbian Archive, the largest archive on the West Coast dedicated to preserving and promoting lesbian and feminist history and culture; the papers of Evelyn Hooker, a UCLA psychology professor whose research comparing the mental health of homosexual and heterosexuals males is thought to be the major reason the American Psychological Association (APA) began advocating for acceptance of homosexuality; and the collection of Paul Monette, a novelist and poet who is well-known for his poignant writings about his experience with AIDS. 

Box lunches will be provided.

Maximum Participants: 30

Fee: $110

Accessibility: Challenging level of walking. Two sites have stair access only to the 2nd floor.  

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions will be provided via email to those who register for tours.



Monday April 29, 2013 9:00am - 5:30pm
Off-site

9:30am

Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens

From the Sheraton Hotel, we will take a short bus ride to the expansive grounds of the Huntington. The day will include two behind-the-scenes tours before the site opens to the public, starting with a tour of the Huntington Library which will include the reading rooms, the Conservation and Imaging labs and the Technical Services area, where some highlights from the rare book collections will be on view.  Following the library tour, Catherine Hess, Chief Curator of European Art, will lead the group through the Huntington mansion, where the European art collections are on permanent display. 

After the tours, you will have several hours of free time on your own to view the current exhibition, When They Were Wild: Recapturing California’s Wildflower Heritage, walk through 120 acres of the lush gardens which includes Japanese, Chinese, Rose, and Cactus Gardens, or have lunch on your own. Lunch options are available at the café or the Rose Garden Tea Room. After the free time, we will meet as a group at 4:00 to take the bus back to the Sheraton.

Note: If you plan to eat at the Rose Garden Tea Room, reservations are required and should be made 2 weeks in advance. Call 626-683-8131 or visit their website. Tours will end at 12:30. Please schedule your reservations with this in mind. 

Maximum Participants: 18

Fee: $65

Accessibility:  Challenging level of walking.

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Monday April 29, 2013 9:30am - 5:00pm
Off-site

10:00am

10:00am

The Gamble House (Tour #2)

By bus from the Sheraton Hotel we will travel a short distance to begin our day at 10:30 AM at the Gamble House with a 1 ¼ hours guided walk with a Gamble House docent through the historic Arroyo Terrace neighborhood. This National Register historic district has nine Greene & Greene houses as well as the works of other noted architects such as Myron Hunt, Edwin Bergstrom, Elmer Grey, and D. M. Renton. Among these are the personal residences of Myron Hunt and of Charles Greene. The tour will also stop to admire the elegant gates of Westmoreland Place. The walking tour will proceed rain or shine.  We will enjoy box lunches on the patio from 11:45-12:30, followed by a 2 ½ hour docent-led “Behind the Velvet Ropes” tour of Greene & Greene’s Gamble House. "On this tour you are invited behind the scenes to visit parts of the House (otherwise unavailable to the public). You walk inside the rooms and, with flashlight in hand, examine at close quarters exquisite craftsman details. You have time to appreciate the ambience of this National Historic Landmark." The experienced and passionate docent will share excitement and knowledge as we explore details of the architecture not normally seen from a distance. The bus will pick up the group at 3:00 at the Gamble House, make a stop to pick up the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Tour and return to the Sheraton Hotel at 4:00. 

Maximum Participants: 10

Tour Fee:  $110

Accessibility: Challenging level of activity. The house is three-stories with stairs -with -handrails access only.  Walkers with tips and canes are welcome.   

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.


Monday April 29, 2013 10:00am - 4:00pm
Off-site

12:30pm

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Cal Tech

Note: Due to site requirements the registration deadline for this tour is March 31.

This unique tour experience provides the opportunity to explore the world where art and science collide. From the Sheraton Hotel we will travel by bus to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where we will begin with viewing a multimedia presentation “Journey to the Planets and Beyond,” which provides an overview of JPL’s activities and accomplishments. Then we will receive a general tour of JPL, before meeting our host Dan Goods, an artist who works with space engineers. For nearly a decade, he has been the only visual artist working as a regular employee at any NASA center, and he is considered JPL’s only “visual strategist.” We will visit Goods’ studio, where he explores themes of science and challenging materials. He has created exhibitions at JPL, the Pasadena California Museum of Art, and the Technorama Museum in Switzerland.  

Maximum Participants: 22

Fee: $35

Accessibility: Challenging level of walking. The tour will consist of approximately 0.8 miles worth of walking. It is spread out over the course of 2 1/2 hours with many stops. There is a significant amount of stairs, however elevators are available. Wheelchairs, walkers, motorized scooters are accommodated but not provided.  There is some standing on the tour, but most of the locations have seating.  

Transportation Note: Participants will meet in the Sheraton Hotel Lobby, ten minutes before the tour start time listed in the program. Bus Tours depart from the Sheraton main entrance on Cordova Street. Specific instructions were provided via e-mail to those who registered for this tour. If questions, please ask at Registration/Hospitality Desk.



Monday April 29, 2013 12:30pm - 4:00pm
Off-site