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Friday, April 26 • 8:30am - 12:00pm
Crafting Assessment Questions: Creating the Tools to Assess Information Literacy Objectives for Art and Design

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Instructors:

Rebecca Feind, Librarian for Art and Design, San Jose State University

Kathy Clarke, Librarian, James Madison University

Now that information literacy standards for higher education have been created and are commonly incorporated within university curricula, assessing student mastery of the objectives is the next step in creating a measurable information literacy program. In addition to responding to institutional needs for data on student learning, assessment data is a valuable resource for updating instruction programs based on student knowledge and performance.  While many librarians have vast amounts of anecdotal knowledge about what students know, being able to gather hard data on what students learn from online and in-person instruction can quantify the strengths and needs of your instruction program, making it easier to report on the library’s role in student learning.  Writing effective test questions is the foundation of any assessment endeavor.  Assessing complex abilities, such as information literacy, requires a combination of creativity and formal methodology.  This workshop will focus on the art and science of crafting test questions that assess student knowledge of specific objectives.  Writing useful test questions draws on creativity as well as familiarity with standards.   Using ACRL’s Information Competencies for Higher Education and ARLIS’ Information Competencies for Students in Design Disciplines, the workshop leaders will engage participants in identifying which objectives lend themselves to being assessed via multiple choice formats.  The essentials of writing multiple-choice items will be addressed via the Haladyna, Downing, and Rodriguez Revised Taxonomy of Multiple Choice Item Writing Guides.  Presented information will include how to select objectives for assessment and elements of effective test questions.  Aspects of test construction and administration will also be addressed.  Workshop participants will have the opportunity to practice writing questions and review sample questions for reliability and validity.

Maximum Participants: 20

Fee:  $50


Friday April 26, 2013 8:30am - 12:00pm
Conference Center 211

Attendees (21)